THE RUDE GUIDE TO MITT by Alex Pareene

THE RUDE GUIDE TO MITT

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A quick-and-dirty evaluation of the Republican nominee.

Readers expecting a “fair and balanced” look at Romney—whether or not they subscribe to the FoxNews version of the term—will likely know better than to think this book is unbiased. Any notions otherwise are dispelled in the introduction, which Salon writer Pareene leads off with the story of the Romney car trip during which they crated the family dog on the roof. Fortunately, this upfront indictment serves as a sort of throat clearing for the author, who then turns to an outline of Romney's childhood and adolescence, noting his staunch neutrality throughout the 1960s and his wholehearted embracing of Mormonism as a young man. Romney’s style of governing followed his ascension to the upper echelons of investment through the slash-and-burn acquisition tactics of Bain Capital. His early efforts in achieving higher office were derailed in an ill-advised contest against Sen. Ted Kennedy, who trounced him, and Romney was forced back into management, where he put his money-raising abilities to good use in heading the Salt Lake Organizing Committee for the Olympics. Pareene veers back and forth—much as Romney has—in detailing the candidate’s successes and failures. Ultimately, this is a book for both liberals and conservatives. Democrats will share it with their friends as a damning inducement to vote Democrat, while Republican voters will point to it as another example of the liberal media bias. Clearly, Pareene also hopes that moderate voters will turn away from Romney.

Ample ammunition for both the left and the right wing as Romney gears up for his battle with Obama.

Pub Date: April 23rd, 2012
ISBN: 978-0-9854728-0-1
Page count: 66pp
Publisher: Salon Media Group
Review Posted Online:
Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 15th, 2012




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