FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT: ARCHITECT by Alexander O. Boulton

FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT: ARCHITECT

An Illustrated Biography
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KIRKUS REVIEW

 A handsome, large-sized volume, attractively illustrated with photos, Wright's own drawings, and decorative designs based on his works, but one whose audience is a bit problematic. Boulton's account of Wright's early life seems to be addressed to young people; the architect's personal life as an adult (a typical genius, he was irresponsible with money, left a wife and six children, and had relationships with three more women; some assistants were notably loyal, but he was such an idiosyncratic autocrat that others found him impossible) is narrated in a forthright, nonjudgmental style. But the author's assessment of Wright as an architect verges on scholarly--anyone not already versed in art history will find it difficult, even with the help of the glossary of technical terms, key figures, etc. Also, though the illustrations are fine as far as they go, there are intriguing descriptions of buildings that, frustratingly, are not shown; and while the spidery sans-serif is in harmony with Wright's style, it's not easy to read, especially in large blocks. Still, for the informed reader, a coherent, intelligent portrayal of an extraordinarily fecund imagination, and of the evolution of Wright's architectural innovations and their importance in architectural history. Chronology; glossary; bibliography; index. (Nonfiction. YA+)

Pub Date: Oct. 1st, 1993
ISBN: 0-8478-1683-4
Page count: 128pp
Publisher: Rizzoli
Review Posted Online:
Kirkus Reviews Issue: Nov. 15th, 1993