A terrific introduction to the ups and downs of measurement as well as relative scale.

HOW TALL WAS A T. REX?

Based on current fossil evidence, as tall as 10 velociraptors—or one giraffe.

Limentani doesn’t stop with height, though, and, as in her How Much Does a Ladybug Weigh? (2016) and How Long Is a Whale? (2017), profiles her subject in full using singularly vivid comparisons. T. Rex’s eyes were “as big as baseballs,” its teeth the size of bananas, its body and tail together as long as “6 lions.” In bold-lined, digitally colored linocut and collatype prints, she vividly demonstrates her comparisons. At one point she lines up sports balls of different sorts beneath a toothy head (playfully setting a baseball in the socket of a skeletal one on the opposite page to show placement), and at another she balances a T. Rex on one end of a teeter-totter with three 5,500-pound modern hippos on the other. She properly qualifies less-verifiable claims—T. Rex “might have been” scaly or feathered, “could have run as fast as an elephant or a meerkat”—but bases her physical estimates on specific fossils dubbed “Thomas,” “Stan,” and “Sue” and backs them up with an appended set of size ranges in feet and inches (no metric measurements are given).

A terrific introduction to the ups and downs of measurement as well as relative scale. (Informational picture book. 4-7)

Pub Date: June 5, 2018

ISBN: 978-1-9107-1657-1

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Boxer Books

Review Posted Online: April 25, 2018

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 15, 2018

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Bruce Goldstone’s Awesome Autumn (2012) is still the gold standard.

HELLO AUTUMN!

Rotner follows Hello Spring (2017) with this salute to the fall season.

Name a change seen in northern climes in fall, and Rotner likely covers it here, from plants, trees, and animals to the food we harvest: seeds are spread, the days grow shorter and cooler, the leaves change and fall (and are raked up and jumped in), some animals migrate, and many families celebrate Halloween and Thanksgiving. As in the previous book, the photographs (presented in a variety of sizes and layouts, all clean) are the stars here, displaying both the myriad changes of the season and a multicultural array of children enjoying the outdoors in fall. These are set against white backgrounds that make the reddish-orange print pop. The text itself uses short sentences and some solid vocabulary (though “deep sleep” is used instead of “hibernate”) to teach readers the markers of autumn, though in the quest for simplicity, Rotner sacrifices some truth. In several cases, the addition of just a few words would have made the following oversimplified statements reflect reality: “Birds grow more feathers”; “Cranberries float and turn red.” Also, Rotner includes the statement “Bees store extra honey in their hives” on a page about animals going into deep sleep, implying that honeybees hibernate, which is false.

Bruce Goldstone’s Awesome Autumn (2012) is still the gold standard. (Informational picture book. 4-7)

Pub Date: Sept. 5, 2017

ISBN: 978-0-8234-3869-3

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Holiday House

Review Posted Online: June 27, 2017

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 15, 2017

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A solid addition to Rotner’s seasonal series. Bring on summer.

HELLO WINTER!

Rotner follows up her celebrations of spring and autumn with this look at all things winter.

Beginning with the signs that winter is coming—bare trees, shorter days, colder temperatures—Rotner eases readers into the season. People light fires and sing songs on the solstice, trees and plants stop growing, and shadows grow long. Ice starts to form on bodies of water and windows. When the snow flies, the fun begins—bundle up and then build forts, make snowballs and snowmen (with eyebrows!), sled, ski (nordic is pictured), skate, snowshoe, snowboard, drink hot chocolate. Animals adapt to the cold as well. “Birds grow more feathers” (there’s nothing about fluffing and air insulation) and mammals, more hair. They have to search for food, and Rotner discusses how many make or find shelter, slow down, hibernate, or go underground or underwater to stay warm. One page talks about celebrating holidays with lights and decorations. The photos show a lit menorah, an outdoor deciduous tree covered in huge Christmas bulbs, a girl next to a Chinese dragon head, a boy with lit luminarias, and some fireworks. The final spread shows signs of the season’s shift to spring. Rotner’s photos, as always, are a big draw. The children are a marvelous mix of cultures and races, and all show their clear delight with winter.

A solid addition to Rotner’s seasonal series. Bring on summer. (Informational picture book. 4-7)

Pub Date: Oct. 16, 2018

ISBN: 978-0-8234-3976-8

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Holiday House

Review Posted Online: Aug. 14, 2018

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 1, 2018

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