Count on repeated readings of this fun and frisky tale.

READ REVIEW

ONE TWO THAT'S MY SHOE

In a companion to Apple Pie ABC (2011), Murray reworks another familiar rhyme into a drama pitched perfectly for preschoolers.

Endpapers hint at the plot and provide an opportunity to identify numbers, colors and story elements. More foreshadowing occurs in the cozy scene of the returning heroine and her beagle opposite the title page; she is reading, appropriately, To Catch a Thief.  Immediately the pace quickens as the dog snatches the child’s shoe and cavorts through the house, garden and gate. The brief, rhymed text (“One… / Two / That’s my shoe!”) is carefully placed to allow viewers time to count the teddy bears, flowers, etc., along the way. Each numeral appears with a matching set of objects in a block anchored to a page corner; the number is spelled out nearby. Warm cream backgrounds showcase the pale turquoise rectangles of the flooring, the brilliant red chair, tulips and shoes and the green patches of grass and tree canopy. The illustrator’s background in textiles is evident in the retro styling and meticulous design. A wash line scene, in which the two figures are silhouetted behind transparent, patterned sheets drying on a line, offers an entertaining visual trick. In a satisfying conclusion, hens chase the dog, setting the stage for a homophonic “Shoo!” and a narrative twist.

Count on repeated readings of this fun and frisky tale.   (Picture book. 18 mos.-5)

Pub Date: June 5, 2012

ISBN: 978-1-4231-4329-1

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Disney-Hyperion

Review Posted Online: March 14, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: April 1, 2012

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Little Blue’s fans will enjoy the animal sounds and counting opportunities, but it’s the sparkling lights on the truck’s own...

LITTLE BLUE TRUCK'S CHRISTMAS

The sturdy Little Blue Truck is back for his third adventure, this time delivering Christmas trees to his band of animal pals.

The truck is decked out for the season with a Christmas wreath that suggests a nose between headlights acting as eyeballs. Little Blue loads up with trees at Toad’s Trees, where five trees are marked with numbered tags. These five trees are counted and arithmetically manipulated in various ways throughout the rhyming story as they are dropped off one by one to Little Blue’s friends. The final tree is reserved for the truck’s own use at his garage home, where he is welcomed back by the tree salestoad in a neatly circular fashion. The last tree is already decorated, and Little Blue gets a surprise along with readers, as tiny lights embedded in the illustrations sparkle for a few seconds when the last page is turned. Though it’s a gimmick, it’s a pleasant surprise, and it fits with the retro atmosphere of the snowy country scenes. The short, rhyming text is accented with colored highlights, red for the animal sounds and bright green for the numerical words in the Christmas-tree countdown.

Little Blue’s fans will enjoy the animal sounds and counting opportunities, but it’s the sparkling lights on the truck’s own tree that will put a twinkle in a toddler’s eyes. (Picture book. 2-5)

Pub Date: Sept. 23, 2014

ISBN: 978-0-544-32041-3

Page Count: 24

Publisher: HMH Books

Review Posted Online: Aug. 12, 2014

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 1, 2014

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Plotless and pointless, the book clearly exists only because its celebrity author wrote it.

YOUR BABY'S FIRST WORD WILL BE DADA

A succession of animal dads do their best to teach their young to say “Dada” in this picture-book vehicle for Fallon.

A grumpy bull says, “DADA!”; his calf moos back. A sad-looking ram insists, “DADA!”; his lamb baas back. A duck, a bee, a dog, a rabbit, a cat, a mouse, a donkey, a pig, a frog, a rooster, and a horse all fail similarly, spread by spread. A final two-spread sequence finds all of the animals arrayed across the pages, dads on the verso and children on the recto. All the text prior to this point has been either iterations of “Dada” or animal sounds in dialogue bubbles; here, narrative text states, “Now everybody get in line, let’s say it together one more time….” Upon the turn of the page, the animal dads gaze round-eyed as their young across the gutter all cry, “DADA!” (except the duckling, who says, “quack”). Ordóñez's illustrations have a bland, digital look, compositions hardly varying with the characters, although the pastel-colored backgrounds change. The punch line fails from a design standpoint, as the sudden, single-bubble chorus of “DADA” appears to be emanating from background features rather than the baby animals’ mouths (only some of which, on close inspection, appear to be open). It also fails to be funny.

Plotless and pointless, the book clearly exists only because its celebrity author wrote it. (Picture book. 3-5)

Pub Date: June 9, 2015

ISBN: 978-1-250-00934-0

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Feiwel & Friends

Review Posted Online: April 15, 2015

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 2015

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