This quiet, sweet story is a gift for all—explorers, grandchildren, parents—any who celebrate the gift of discovering the...

THE NOT-SO-FARAWAY ADVENTURE

Theo, the warmhearted heroine from The Imaginary Garden (2009), creates an unforgettable adventure for her beloved Poppa’s birthday.

Theo’s Poppa keeps his travel mementos in an old trunk. Through these items, Larsen tells the story of the man—where he’s been, whom he loves, what he values—which must be why Theo pores over each picture, map, and trinket. They speak of excitement and adventure, and they make Theo want to be an explorer too. As Poppa’s birthday nears, she ponders over the perfect present. When Poppa recalls a special meal by the ocean with Nana, Theo realizes what to get him: a trip together! With a hand-drawn map for a guide, they ride the streetcar toward the sand. There, they skip stones, walk barefoot, and find the best gazpacho. At home, Theo adds tokens from the day to Poppa’s memory trunk, knowing their outing made his birthday wish come true. Theo and Poppa are white, and they traverse a vibrant, multicultural city on their adventure.  Luxbacher’s choice to use digital collage ties into the narrative, as found cloth, paper, and photographs become part of a larger story. But it’s Larsen’s compassionate text that makes this intergenerational story soar, simple, declarative sentences evoking the sincerity of Theo’s excitement.

This quiet, sweet story is a gift for all—explorers, grandchildren, parents—any who celebrate the gift of discovering the world together. (Picture book. 3-7)

Pub Date: April 1, 2016

ISBN: 978-1-77138-097-3

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Kids Can

Review Posted Online: Feb. 2, 2016

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Feb. 15, 2016

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Roller-coaster enthusiasts or not, children will eagerly join our intrepid hero on this entertaining ride.

THE PIGEON WILL RIDE THE ROLLER COASTER!

The Pigeon is on an emotional—and physical—roller coaster.

Since learning about the existence of roller coasters, he’s become giddy with excitement. The Pigeon prepares mentally: He’ll need a ticket and “exemplary patience” to wait in line. He envisions zooming up and down and careening through dizzying turns and loops. Then, he imagines his emotions afterward: exhilaration, post-ride blues, pride at having accomplished such a feat, and enthusiasm at the prospect of riding again. (He’ll also feel dizzy and nauseous.) All this before the Pigeon ever sets claw on an actual coaster. So…will he really try it? Are roller coasters fun? When the moment comes, everything seems to go according to plan: waiting in line, settling into the little car, THEN—off he goes! Though the ride itself isn’t quite what the Pigeon expected, it will delight readers. Wearing his feelings on his wing and speaking directly to the audience in first person, the Pigeon describes realistic thoughts and emotions about waiting and guessing about the unknown—common childhood experiences. No sentiment is misplaced; kids will relate to Pigeon’s eagerness and apprehension. The ending falls somewhat flat, but the whole humorous point is that an underwhelming adventure can still be thrilling enough to warrant repeating. Willems’ trademark droll illustrations will have readers giggling. The roller-coaster attendant is light-skinned. (This book was reviewed digitally.)

Roller-coaster enthusiasts or not, children will eagerly join our intrepid hero on this entertaining ride. (Picture book. 3-6)

Pub Date: Sept. 6, 2022

ISBN: 978-1-4549-4686-1

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Union Square Kids

Review Posted Online: June 8, 2022

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 1, 2022

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While this is a fairly bland treatment compared to Deborah Lee Rose and Carey Armstrong-Ellis’ The Twelve Days of...

ON THE FIRST DAY OF KINDERGARTEN

Rabe follows a young girl through her first 12 days of kindergarten in this book based on the familiar Christmas carol.

The typical firsts of school are here: riding the bus, making friends, sliding on the playground slide, counting, sorting shapes, laughing at lunch, painting, singing, reading, running, jumping rope, and going on a field trip. While the days are given ordinal numbers, the song skips the cardinal numbers in the verses, and the rhythm is sometimes off: “On the second day of kindergarten / I thought it was so cool / making lots of friends / and riding the bus to my school!” The narrator is a white brunette who wears either a tunic or a dress each day, making her pretty easy to differentiate from her classmates, a nice mix in terms of race; two students even sport glasses. The children in the ink, paint, and collage digital spreads show a variety of emotions, but most are happy to be at school, and the surroundings will be familiar to those who have made an orientation visit to their own schools.

While this is a fairly bland treatment compared to Deborah Lee Rose and Carey Armstrong-Ellis’ The Twelve Days of Kindergarten (2003), it basically gets the job done. (Picture book. 4-7)

Pub Date: June 21, 2016

ISBN: 978-0-06-234834-0

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Harper/HarperCollins

Review Posted Online: May 4, 2016

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 1, 2016

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