A solid addition to the popular series for toddlers and preschoolers.

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LLAMA LLAMA, TIME TO SHARE

Dewdney’s newest Llama Llama picture book delivers a lesson in social skills to its camelid protagonist and its young readers, too.

When the brand-new (gnu) neighbors come to visit, Llama Llama’s mother prompts him to befriend Nelly Gnu while she serves up tea for Mrs. Gnu and her babe in arms. Seeming rather leery about his mother’s admonition, “…don’t forget to share,” Llama Llama leads his playmate over to his toys. All goes well enough until she starts playing with his prized Fuzzy Llama doll—without his permission. A tug of war ensues, and the doll ends up with a ripped-off appendage. Luckily, Mama Llama is not only a good hostess, she’s also handy with a needle and thread. Both mothers prompt their young ones to apologize to one another, and Fuzzy Llama is left on the step until they are ready to share. All’s well that ends well, and after playing happily with other toys, they do end up sharing Fuzzy Llama, and the visit ends with them as fast friends looking forward to their next play date. While the rhyming text comes across as rather forced or twee in places, bright, cheery illustrations match the positive, easy tone of the story with its easily resolved conflict.

A solid addition to the popular series for toddlers and preschoolers. (Picture book. 2-4)

Pub Date: Sept. 4, 2012

ISBN: 978-0-670-01233-6

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Viking

Review Posted Online: July 22, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 1, 2012

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A good choice for caregivers looking for a positive, uncomplicated introduction to a new baby that focuses on everything an...

I AM A BIG BROTHER

A little boy exults in his new role as big brother.

Rhyming text describes the arrival of a new baby and all of the big brother’s rewarding new duties. He gets to help with feedings, diaper changes, playtime, bathtime, and naptime. Though the rhyming couplets can sometimes feel a bit forced and awkward, the sentiment is sweet, as the focus here never veers from the excitement and love a little boy feels for his tiny new sibling. The charming, uncluttered illustrations convincingly depict the growing bond between this fair-skinned, rosy-cheeked, smiling pair of boys. In the final pages, the parents, heretofore kept mostly out of view, are pictured holding the children. The accompanying text reads: “Mommy, Daddy, baby, me. / We love each other—a family!” In companion volume I Am a Big Sister, the little boy is replaced with a little girl with bows in her hair. Some of the colors and patterns in the illustrations are slightly altered, but it is essentially the same title.

A good choice for caregivers looking for a positive, uncomplicated introduction to a new baby that focuses on everything an older sibling can do to help. (Board book. 2-4)

Pub Date: Jan. 27, 2015

ISBN: 978-0-545-68886-4

Page Count: 24

Publisher: Cartwheel/Scholastic

Review Posted Online: March 17, 2015

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 1, 2015

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Parents of toddlers starting school or day care should seek separation-anxiety remedies elsewhere, and fans of the original...

A KISSING HAND FOR CHESTER RACCOON

From the Kissing Hand series

A sweetened, condensed version of the best-selling picture book, The Kissing Hand.

As in the original, Chester Raccoon is nervous about attending Owl’s night school (raccoons are nocturnal). His mom kisses him on the paw and reminds him, “With a Kissing Hand… / We’ll never be apart.” The text boils the story down to its key elements, causing this version to feel rushed. Gone is the list of fun things Chester will get to do at school. Fans of the original may be disappointed that this board edition uses a different illustrator. Gibson’s work is equally sentimental, but her renderings are stiff and flat in comparison to the watercolors of Harper and Leak. Very young readers will probably not understand that Owl’s tree, filled with opossums, a squirrel, a chipmunk and others, is supposed to be a school.

Parents of toddlers starting school or day care should seek separation-anxiety remedies elsewhere, and fans of the original shouldn’t look to this version as replacement for their page-worn copies. (Board book. 2-4)

Pub Date: April 1, 2014

ISBN: 978-1-933718-77-4

Page Count: 14

Publisher: Tanglewood Publishing

Review Posted Online: May 19, 2014

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 1, 2014

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