KIDS AROUND THE WORLD COOK!

This cookbook for recipes from around the world chooses neither the best foods nor the best recipes, but does include some odd and interesting information about the history of what we eat. Dividing the text into chapters on beverages, grains, soups and starters, main courses, and deserts, the author includes a section on kitchen safety and provides brief information on special ingredients. Braman (Kids Around the World Create. Not reviewed), is a former teacher, who states she has tested the recipes with fourth graders and simplified recipes for young cooks. Maybe, but Baklawa (Egyptian phyllo with ground nuts and coconut) and Injera (Ethiopian flat bread) are not usually considered starter recipes. Some information given is neither safe nor accurate. She suggests cooking bratwurst in a pan over medium heat till lightly brown. Gourmet magazine recommends simmering brats for twenty minutes before grilling, or pan browning. Undercooked sausages are NOT SAFE. Elsewhere, she describes New York egg creams, as `a combination of eggs, cream, chocolate syrup and soda.` Most New Yorkers will tell you egg creams have neither eggs nor cream. The format is distracting for cooks, since the author introduces a type of food, then gives some food history from other times and cultures, lists ingredients for a specific recipe, gives the stepbystep procedure, and then introduces a food from still another culture. Line drawings and photographs appear throughout. Some specialized cooking terms are defined in the glossary. Index was not seen. An additional purchase where multicultural materials are in heavy demand. (Nonfiction 1012)

Pub Date: April 1, 2000

ISBN: 0-471-35251-9

Page Count: 128

Publisher: Wiley

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: April 1, 2000

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HOW CHIPMUNK GOT HIS STRIPES

A TALE OF BRAGGING AND TEASING

Noted storyteller Bruchac (Squanto’s Journey: The Story of the First Thanksgiving, p. 1498, etc.) teams up with his son, James (Native American Games and Stories, not reviewed) to present a pourquoi tale from the East Coast Native American tradition. Bear is undeniably big; he is also a braggart, given to walking through the forest and proclaiming his superiority to all within earshot: “I can do anything! Yes, I can!” When he hears this, little Brown Squirrel challenges Bear to tell the sun not to rise the next day. This Bear does, and when the sun does in fact rise despite his injunction not to, Brown Squirrel unwisely gloats: “Bear is foolish, the sun came up. Bear is silly, the sun came up.” Thanks to trickery, Brown Squirrel escapes with his life, but not before Bear claws the stripes into his back that cause him to change his name to Chipmunk. The Bruchacs translate the orality of the tale to written text beautifully, including dialogue that invites audience participation. Aruego and Dewey’s (Mouse in Love, p. 886, etc.) signature cartoon-like illustrations extend the humor of the text perfectly. One spread shows the faces of all the animals rejoicing in the yellow light of the newly risen sun—all except Bear, whose glower contrasts ominously with Brown Squirrel’s glee. Clever use of perspective emphasizes the difference in size between boastful Bear and his pint-sized trickster opponent. Authors’ notes precede the story, explaining the history of the tale and each teller’s relationship to it. A winner. (Picture book/folktale. 4-8)

Pub Date: March 1, 2001

ISBN: 0-8037-2404-7

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Dial

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Dec. 15, 2000

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Copious kid-friendly information on a vitally important topic, stylishly presented, makes this book essential. Knowledge is...

EAT THIS!

HOW FAST FOOD MARKETING GETS YOU TO BUY JUNK (AND HOW TO FIGHT BACK)

A comprehensive compilation of fast-food marketing practices aimed at youth and ways kids can recognize and combat them.

In this slim, 15-chapter book, Curtis begins with the basics, clearly explaining what marketing is: “the art and science of persuasion.” The author’s upbeat, nonpatronizing tone is a selling point in itself as she explains how fast-food marketers place product brands in entertainment culture—movies, TV shows, and video games—to persuade kids to identify with or become loyal to a type of junk food; how they infiltrate schools by creating fundraisers and teaching resources that feature their product; and how they create kid-friendly spokescharacters such as Ronald McDonald, among many other manipulative practices. The good news is that the book’s target audience—kids—will feel empowered as they learn how they are being influenced and are educated in ways to fight back. Segments labeled “Do This!” suggest ways readers can participate in anti–fast-food advocacy and tell stories of real-life kids and parents who exposed junk-food marketing practices. Facts about the unhealthy results of eating fast food based on statistics from countries around the world are included as well as information on what real food is. Collins’ snappy designs depict youth of many ethnicities and share space with clear, well-chosen stock photographs.

Copious kid-friendly information on a vitally important topic, stylishly presented, makes this book essential. Knowledge is power. (sources, glossary, author interview) (Nonfiction. 9-14)

Pub Date: May 1, 2018

ISBN: 978-0-88995-532-5

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Red Deer Press

Review Posted Online: Feb. 19, 2018

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 1, 2018

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