KIDS AROUND THE WORLD COOK!

This cookbook for recipes from around the world chooses neither the best foods nor the best recipes, but does include some odd and interesting information about the history of what we eat. Dividing the text into chapters on beverages, grains, soups and starters, main courses, and deserts, the author includes a section on kitchen safety and provides brief information on special ingredients. Braman (Kids Around the World Create. Not reviewed), is a former teacher, who states she has tested the recipes with fourth graders and simplified recipes for young cooks. Maybe, but Baklawa (Egyptian phyllo with ground nuts and coconut) and Injera (Ethiopian flat bread) are not usually considered starter recipes. Some information given is neither safe nor accurate. She suggests cooking bratwurst in a pan over medium heat till lightly brown. Gourmet magazine recommends simmering brats for twenty minutes before grilling, or pan browning. Undercooked sausages are NOT SAFE. Elsewhere, she describes New York egg creams, as `a combination of eggs, cream, chocolate syrup and soda.` Most New Yorkers will tell you egg creams have neither eggs nor cream. The format is distracting for cooks, since the author introduces a type of food, then gives some food history from other times and cultures, lists ingredients for a specific recipe, gives the stepbystep procedure, and then introduces a food from still another culture. Line drawings and photographs appear throughout. Some specialized cooking terms are defined in the glossary. Index was not seen. An additional purchase where multicultural materials are in heavy demand. (Nonfiction 1012)

Pub Date: April 1, 2000

ISBN: 0-471-35251-9

Page Count: 128

Publisher: Wiley

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: April 1, 2000

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THIS BOOK IS ANTI-RACIST

20 LESSONS ON HOW TO WAKE UP, TAKE ACTION, AND DO THE WORK

A guidebook for taking action against racism.

The clear title and bold, colorful illustrations will immediately draw attention to this book, designed to guide each reader on a personal journey to work to dismantle racism. In the author’s note, Jewell begins with explanations about word choice, including the use of the terms “folx,” because it is gender neutral, and “global majority,” noting that marginalized communities of color are actually the majority in the world. She also chooses to capitalize Black, Brown, and Indigenous as a way of centering these communities’ voices; "white" is not capitalized. Organized in four sections—identity, history, taking action, and working in solidarity—each chapter builds on the lessons of the previous section. Underlined words are defined in the glossary, but Jewell unpacks concepts around race in an accessible way, bringing attention to common misunderstandings. Activities are included at the end of each chapter; they are effective, prompting both self-reflection and action steps from readers. The activities are designed to not be written inside the actual book; instead Jewell invites readers to find a special notebook and favorite pen and use that throughout. Combining the disruption of common fallacies, spotlights on change makers, the author’s personal reflections, and a call to action, this powerful book has something for all young people no matter what stage they are at in terms of awareness or activism.

Essential. (author’s note, further reading, glossary, select bibliography) (Nonfiction. 10-18)

Pub Date: Jan. 7, 2020

ISBN: 978-0-7112-4521-1

Page Count: 160

Publisher: Frances Lincoln

Review Posted Online: Sept. 15, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Oct. 1, 2019

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Ideal for any community where children count.

COUNTING ON COMMUNITY

A difficult concept is simply and strikingly illustrated for the very youngest members of any community, with a counting exercise to boot.

From the opening invitation, “Living in community, / it's a lot of FUN! / Lets count the ways. / Lets start with ONE,” Nagaro shows an urban community that is multicultural, supportive, and happy—exactly like the neighborhoods that many families choose to live and raise their children in. Text on every other page rhymes unobtrusively. Unlike the vocabulary found in A Is for Activist (2013), this book’s is entirely age-appropriate (though some parents might not agree that picketing is a way to show “that we care”). In A Is for Activist, a cat was hidden on each page; this time, finding the duck is the game. Counting is almost peripheral to the message. On the page with “Seven bikes and scooters and helmets to share,” identifying toys in an artistic heap is confusing. There is only one helmet for five toys, unless you count the second helmet worn by the girl riding a scooter—but then there are eight items, not seven. Seven helmets and seven toys would have been clearer. That quibble aside, Nagara's graphic design skills are evident, with deep colors, interesting angles, and strong lines, in a mix of digital collage and ink.

Ideal for any community where children count. (Board book. 2-5)

Pub Date: Sept. 15, 2015

ISBN: 978-1-60980-632-3

Page Count: 24

Publisher: Triangle Square Books for Young Readers

Review Posted Online: July 27, 2015

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 1, 2016

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