213 VALENTINES

Reluctantly bused to a program for gifted children, Wade is one of two black kids in his fourth grade; the other is Dink, girl and known nerd. Neither is made particularly welcome by the more privileged children in their new class, most of whom already know each other; even the teacher lacks warmth, and is oblivious to the social and economic pressures exerted by traditional Halloween or Valentine's celebrations. Though Wade is soon respected as a math whiz, he's so busy building defenses that he rejects all tentative proffers of friendship; he does sit with Dink at lunch to avoid being alone. Since Valentine's Day promises to be especially painful—he's sure that only the person who draws his name will give him a card—he decides to send masses of them to himself. Fortunately, Dink's patient courtesy and help make him reconsider; when the day comes, he generously distributes his valentines to family, class, and the pediatric ward where his aunt works—plus 50 to a delighted Dink. Neither preaching nor sugar coating, Cohen tells her story with practiced ease. Her characterizations may be not deep, but they're realistic and individual; wondering whether Ward will really carry through with his misguided attempt to save face holds interest to the end. Good additional fare. (Fiction. 7-10)*justify no*

Pub Date: Sept. 1, 1991

ISBN: 0-8050-1536-1

Page Count: 54

Publisher: Henry Holt

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 1, 1991

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A Christmas cozy, read straight or bit by bit through the season.

HOW WINSTON DELIVERED CHRISTMAS

Neither snow nor rain nor mountains of yummy cheese stay the carrier of a letter to Santa.

So carelessly does 8-year-old Oliver stuff his very late letter to Santa into the mailbox that it falls out behind his back—leaving Winston, a “small, grubby white mouse” with an outsized heart, determined to deliver it personally though he has no idea where to go. Smith presents Winston’s Christmas Eve trek in 24 minichapters, each assigned a December “day” and all closing with both twists or cliffhangers and instructions (mostly verbal, unfortunately) for one or more holiday-themed recipes or craft projects. Though he veers occasionally into preciosity (Winston “tried to ignore the grumbling, rumbling noises coming from his tummy”), he also infuses his holiday tale with worthy values. Occasional snowy scenes have an Edwardian look appropriate to the general tone, with a white default in place but a few dark-skinned figures in view. Less-crafty children will struggle with the scantly illustrated projects, which run from paper snowflakes to clothespin dolls and Christmas crackers with or without “snaps,” but lyrics to chestnuts like “The 12 Days of Christmas” (and “Jingle Bells,” which is not a Christmas song, but never mind) at the end invite everyone to sing along.

A Christmas cozy, read straight or bit by bit through the season. (Fantasy. 7-10)

Pub Date: Sept. 17, 2019

ISBN: 978-1-68412-983-6

Page Count: 176

Publisher: Silver Dolphin

Review Posted Online: July 14, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 1, 2019

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CHRISTMAS TAPESTRY

This longer Christmas story centers on an embroidered tapestry purchased to hang in a church for the Christmas Eve service. As with many of her works, Polacco (When Lightning Comes in a Jar, p. 665, etc.) sets her story in Michigan, this time in wintry Detroit. Young Jonathan resents his family’s recent move from Tennessee to where his minister father has been reassigned to renovate an old church and revive its congregation. Through a series of Dickensian trials and coincidences, the tapestry is purchased to cover some water damage to a church wall, and an elderly Jewish woman (and Holocaust survivor) whom the family has befriended recognizes the tapestry as the one she made in pre-WWII Germany for her wedding ceremony. In an ending worthy of O. Henry, the repairman who arrives on Christmas Eve to inspect the water damage turns out to be the woman’s long-lost husband (each thought the other had died in the Holocaust), and the devoted couple is reunited. Polacco succeeds as always with her watercolor-and-pencil illustrations in creating unique, expressive characters who seem to have real lives in their snowy city streets, cozy living rooms, and busy church. The gentle, reassuring message, suggested to Jonathan by his kindly father, is that “the universe unfolds as it should,” even when we don’t understand the pattern of the tapestry. (Picture book. 7-10)

Pub Date: Sept. 1, 2002

ISBN: 0-399-23955-3

Page Count: 160

Publisher: Philomel

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Nov. 1, 2002

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