An earnest, if unpolished, rendition of a folk song with a strong musical accompaniment.

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WALK SHEPHERDESS, WALK

A SING-ALONG BOOK

An American folk song about a shepherdess, her young friend, and a flock finds new life in this debut picture book.

The shepherdess and her friend glide through golden fields and gaze over ocean cliffs in their joyful quest for a special family of sheep. While the ram with the ebony horns and the gold-footed ewe roam the land, the two girls collect daisy chains and dance to the music of the shepherdess’s flute. By the end of the day, they realize that what is most valuable is not the sheep but the time they spent together (“And if we / never find them / I shan’t care, / shall you?”). Lush, impressionistic watercolor landscapes illustrate each line of the simple 1916 song by Eleanor Farjeon. Though the colorful paintings clearly complement the idyllic tone of the story, many panels are blurred and distorted as a result of lackluster production. Cobb’s delicate palette at times appears muddled and indistinct. The author includes an expanded narrative inspired by the song (giving names to the characters), but its placement at the end of the book, without illustrations, makes it feel out of place. Still, Cobb’s companion recording, with soaring operatic vocals backed by a gentle flute and piano arrangement, fully evokes the innocence and serenity of this rustic tale.

An earnest, if unpolished, rendition of a folk song with a strong musical accompaniment.

Pub Date: Oct. 24, 2017

ISBN: 978-1-4575-5180-2

Page Count: 28

Publisher: Dog Ear Publishing

Review Posted Online: Feb. 8, 2018

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The book is perfect for read-alouds, with occasional, often onomatopoeic Spanish words such as “quiquiriquí,” “tacatac” and...

WAITING FOR THE BIBLIOBURRO

Inspired by Colombian librarian Luis Soriano Bohórquez, Brown’s latest tells of a little girl whose wish comes true when a librarian and two book-laden burros visit her remote village.

Ana loves to read and spends all of her free time either reading alone or to her younger brother. She knows every word of the one book she owns. Although she uses her imagination to create fantastical bedtime tales for her brother, she really wants new books to read. Everything changes when a traveling librarian and his two donkeys, Alfa and Beto, arrive in the village. Besides loaning books to the children until his next visit, the unnamed man also reads them stories and teaches the younger children the alphabet. When Ana suggests that someone write a book about the traveling library, he encourages her to complete this task herself. After she reads her library books, Ana writes her own story for the librarian and gives it to him upon his reappearance—and he makes it part of his biblioburro collection. Parra’s colorful folk-style illustrations of acrylics on board bring Ana’s real and imaginary worlds to life. This is a child-centered complement to Jeanette Winter’s Biblioburro (2010), which focuses on Soriano.

The book is perfect for read-alouds, with occasional, often onomatopoeic Spanish words such as “quiquiriquí,” “tacatac” and “iii-aah” adding to the fun.   (author’s note, glossary of Spanish terms) (Picture book. 4-8)

Pub Date: July 12, 2011

ISBN: 978-1-58246-353-7

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Tricycle

Review Posted Online: June 6, 2011

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 15, 2011

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CINDERELLA

This companion piece to the other fairy tales Marcia Brown has interpreted (see Puss In Boots, 1952, p. 548 and others) has the smoothness of a good translation and a unique charm to her feathery light pictures. The pictures have been done in sunset colors and the spreads on each page as they illustrate the story have the cumulative effect of soft cloud banks. Gentle.

Pub Date: June 15, 1954

ISBN: 0684126761

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Scribner

Review Posted Online: Oct. 26, 2011

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 15, 1954

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