COUNTING OUR WAY TO THE 100TH DAY!

100 POEMS

One hundred short poems plus one hundred jazzy illustrations add up to a satisfying whole in this poetry collection aimed at elementary-school children celebrating the one-hundredth day of class. The subject matter of the bouncy, humorous poems includes an amazing variety of math concepts as well as a sprinkling of science, history, language arts, and even a recipe, all relating to 100 in some way. Many of the poems are math problems in disguise, but delivered with a light touch that incorporates curriculum concepts with deft skill. A few of the poems stumble a little in their meter or have slightly skewed rhyming pairs, but the overall effort will find a favored place in hundreds of classrooms. Salerno’s bright gouache paintings include 100 smiling children on the cover and all sorts of funny animals and situations. His accurate illustrations of 100 items can actually be counted by sharp-eyed kids: yes, there really are 100 spots on that lime-green, polka-dot gecko. Teachers will think of dozens of ways to use this collection, not only on the hundredth day of school, but on all the other days as well. (Poetry. 5-9)

Pub Date: July 1, 2004

ISBN: 0-689-84793-9

Page Count: 48

Publisher: McElderry

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 15, 2004

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet

Both playful and enlightening, period.

A BUNCH OF PUNCTUATION

A collection of peppy poems and clever pictures explains different forms of punctuation.

Rebecca Kai Dotlich’s “A Punctuation Tale” kicks off the proceedings with a punny description of a day full of punctuation; goodnight is “cuddled / in quotation marks.” Ensuing poems discuss the comma, the apostrophe, the dash (“A subdued dude / in tweet and text / he signals what / is coming next”), the colon, the exclamation point, and ellipses. Allan Wolf’s poem about this last is called “…” and begins, “The silent ellipsis… / replaces…words missed.” Prince Redcloud’s “Question Marks” is particularly delightful, with the question “Why?” dancing diagonally down in stair steps. The emphatic answer is a repeated “Because!” Other poems pay tribute to quotation marks, the hyphen, and the period. Michele Kruger explains “The Purpose of Parentheses”: “inside a pair / ( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) / of slender curves / we’ll hold your few / inserted words.” The final poem is editor Hopkins’ own, “Lines Written for You to Think About” (inspired by Carl Sandburg), urging young readers to write their own verses employing (what else?) punctuation. The 12 poets included work with a variety of devices and styles for an always-fresh feel. Bloch’s illustrations are delightfully surprising, both illustrating each poem’s key points and playfully riffing on the punctuation itself.

Both playful and enlightening, period. (Picture book/poetry. 5-8)

Pub Date: Aug. 7, 2018

ISBN: 978-1-59078-994-0

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Wordsong/Boyds Mills

Review Posted Online: May 28, 2018

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 15, 2018

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet

SEASONS

A BOOK OF POEMS

Two venerable contributors have teamed up to make a small collection of poetry for beginning readers. The I Can Read series has usually produced fine volumes that new young readers can actually read themselves; this has the added attraction of introducing various kinds of verse forms, both rhymed and unrhymed, in very short bursts. The contents are divided by season: Eleven poems each for “Winter Bits” and “Spring Things” and nine poems each for “Summer Thoughts” and “The Feel of Fall.” Not all are completely successful, but most capture that essence of perception that is good poetry. “The crickets / fill the night / with their voices— / It is like / a message / in another language / spoken to a part / of me / who hasn’t / happened yet.” That’s “The Crickets” in its entirety. Although the city is mentioned in some verses, the imagery is decidedly rural if not downright rustic, with wooden fences, dirt roads, and meadows in evidence. Children wear helmets to ride their bikes, and carry backpacks, but the pictures are timeless, if in country mode. Blegvad (First Friends, not reviewed, etc.) is a master of the vibrant line and telling detail—every leaf blows in the wind just so; every child has his or her own specific energy or repose. A small delight. (Poetry. 6-9)

Pub Date: March 1, 2002

ISBN: 0-06-026698-8

Page Count: 64

Publisher: HarperCollins

Review Posted Online: June 24, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 1, 2002

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet
more