THOMAS IN DANGER

This first entry in the American Adventures series is set during the Revolutionary War. When Mr. Bowden joins the Continental army to fight the British, Thomas Bowden, his mother and siblings, Emma and Ben, are forced to flee over the Pocono Mountains to Philadelphia and their Aunt Rachel’s home. Arriving at her sister’s door in a pauper-like state, Mrs. Bowden encounters new owners who are far less than friendly. The Jessups offer Mrs. Bowden a job as their servant only if she is willing to send Emma and Ben to the poorhouse. Rachel’s former servant, Lottie, comes to the aid of the Bowdens, helping them move into the Peach Tree Inn to provide meals for sea captains and businessmen. After overhearing a Tory spy make elicit plans to divert supplies from the Patriot army to the British, Thomas is kidnapped and taken to live with the Iroquois. Despite kindness shown to him, Thomas never fully assimilates into his new way of life and is left behind by the Iroquois when a Patriot army arrives to destroy their village. Pryor’s point, that there are always two sides to every issue, as well as substantial common ground, won’t be lost on readers, as both the Iroquois and the Patriots were fighting battles for independence. The historical details are vivid, the action unfolds at a strong pace, and as the exciting story concludes, the author’s parting comments will make readers reflect anew on American history. (b&w illustrations, not seen) (Fiction. 9-11)

Pub Date: Sept. 1, 1999

ISBN: 0-688-16518-4

Page Count: 167

Publisher: Morrow/HarperCollins

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 15, 1999

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A BIG CHEESE FOR THE WHITE HOUSE

THE TRUE TALE OF A TREMENDOUS CHEDDAR

The author and illustrator bring to life an incident right out of history in this droll picture book enhanced by lively, color- washed pen-and-ink drawings. In Cheshire, Massachusetts, the home of mouth-watering cheese, the local residents grumble that President Jefferson is serving cheese from Norton, Connecticut, at the White House. “I have an idea,” says Elder John Leland to the assembled town folk, “If each of you will give one day’s milking from each of your many cows, we can put our curds together and create a whopping big cheddar.” Although some people scoff, the farmers bring load after load of milk—from 934 cows—to town and they set about making an enormous cheese. There are problems along the way, but eventually the giant cheese is dragged to a barn to age. At last it is perfect, and Mr. Leland and friends start the long haul to the East Room of White House. In a foreword, the author explains the truth and fiction in the tale, e.g., that the presidential residence wasn’t called the White House until about 1809. A humorous tale with a wide range of appeal and uses in and out of the classroom. (Picture book. 8-10)

Pub Date: Sept. 1, 1999

ISBN: 0-7894-2573-4

Page Count: 30

Publisher: DK Publishing

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 1, 1999

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THE GREAT DIVIDE

A MATHEMATICAL MARATHON

From Dodds (The Shape of Things, 1994, not reviewed, etc.), a rhyming, reckless text that makes a math process pleasurably solvable; Mitchell’s illustrative debut features a smashing cast of 1930s characters and a playfulness that will keep readers guessing. The premise is a Great Race: at the sound of the gun, 80 bicycle racers take off at top speed. The path diverges at the top of a cliff, and half the racers hurtle forever downward and right out of the race and the book. The remaining 40 racers determinedly continue in boats, their curls, spyglasses, eye patches, matronly upswept hairdos, and Clara Bow—lips intact. Whirlpools erupt to divide them again and wreck their ships, so it’s time to grab the next horse and ride on. The race continues, despite abrupt changes in modes of transportation and in the number of racers that dwindle by disastrous divisions, until a single winner glides over the finish line in a single-prop plane. The pace is so breathless and engaging that the book’s didactic origins all but disappear; few readers will notice that they’ve just finished a math problem, and most will want to go over all the action again. (Picture book. 5-10)

Pub Date: Nov. 1, 1999

ISBN: 0-7636-0442-9

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Candlewick

Review Posted Online: June 24, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Nov. 15, 1999

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