Better than many at explaining the hows and whys of healthy eating but still a TV show on paper.

READ REVIEW

SUPER SUPPER THROWDOWN

From the Fizzy's Lunch Lab series

The characters from the PBS Kids’ show Fizzy’s Lunch Lab teach kids about the importance of good nutrition.

Professor Fizzy, the master of healthy eating, takes on Fast Food Freddy, greasy food expert. The challenge? The titular cook-off: Each chef will design a meal that three kids will then taste test. While Fizzy works with Avril and Henry, teaching them about the Food Plate, shopping the U at the grocery store and checking labels for nutritional information, Freddy does the opposite; his plate is divided into salty, sweet, greasy and fatty, and he shops the freezer section. The lunch labbers take readers through planning a meal, introducing kitchen safety tips and explaining how to eat a rainbow (of fruits and veggies, not jelly beans, Freddy). Throughout, Sully the Cell interjects to explain how the right foods are used to fuel the body, and Cpl. Cup provides the recipes that help Fizzy win the cook-off: Green Salad with Lime Dressing, Veggilicious Hoagie with Groovy Guacamole, Tortilla Chips and Berry Banana Fro-Yo. With asides about protein, fiber, fats and calcium, Fizzy covers all the bases, and kids can even get some tips on dinner conversation starters and how to set the table. The brightly colored digital illustrations match the TV show to a T, inelegantly making the leap to the page.

Better than many at explaining the hows and whys of healthy eating but still a TV show on paper. (Informational picture book. 6-10)

Pub Date: May 13, 2014

ISBN: 978-0-7636-7279-9

Page Count: 64

Publisher: Candlewick

Review Posted Online: Feb. 19, 2014

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 1, 2014

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A somewhat wordy but helpful manual for children in similar situations.

SAM LOSES HIS TONSILS

A child gets his tonsils removed in Olorunfemi’s picture book.

Sam, a dark-haired, dark-skinned child, visits an Ears Nose and Throat specialist and learns that his oversized adenoids and tonsils must be removed via surgery. He is also diagnosed with sleep apnea. The book chronicles Sam’s experience leading up to his surgery including details like how he can’t eat or drink the night before. At the hospital, Sam gets hooked up to machines and receives “sleepy medicine” [8] called anesthesia. The nurses and surgeon are kind so Sam “wasn’t afraid…and was so happy he would be able to sleep better afterward.”[6] After surgery "Sam was fully awake with no... complications…and…discharged…the same day.”[8] Sam is thrilled that he no longer snores. Although his throat hurts and he can’t eat certain foods, Sam is happy to get home to his siblings and awakens feeling energized. The book functions well as a child-friendly clinical manual as opposed to a story with a plot. The author, an RN, displays clear knowledge of ENT procedures. The medical jargon and details are child-appropriate. Occasionally the text lags and includes unnecessary details like the ages of Sam’s siblings[2]. Still, this is an approachable tool for children requiring ENT procedures. The illustrations mirror the text. Some offer subtext like a scene showing masked surgeons performing Sam’s surgery. Others emphasize medical elements like a closeup of Sam’s throat and tonsils. A somewhat wordy but helpful manual for children in similar situations.

Pub Date: N/A

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: 17

Publisher: FriesenPress

Review Posted Online: April 2, 2020

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One of those rare thrillers whose answers are even more scarifying than its mysteries.

AFTER ALL I'VE DONE

A middle-aged woman sidelined by a horrific accident finds even sharper pains waiting on the other side of her recuperation in this expert nightmare by Hardy, familiar to many readers as Megan Hart, author of All the Secrets We Keep (2017), etc.

Five months ago, while she was on her way to the hospital with an ailing gallbladder, Diana Sparrow’s car hit a deer on a rural Pennsylvania road. When she awoke, she was minus her gallbladder, two working collarbones (and therefore two functioning arms), and her memory. During a recovery that would’ve been impossible without the constant ministrations of Harriett Richmond, the mother-in-law who’s the real reason Diana married her husband, Jonathan, Diana’s discovered that Jonathan has been cheating on her with her childhood friend Valerie Delagatti. Divorce is out of the question: Diana’s grown used to the pampered lifestyle the prenup she’d signed would snatch away from her. Every day is filled with torments. She slips and falls in a pool of wine on her kitchen floor she’s sure she didn’t spill herself. At the emergency room, her credit card and debit card are declined. She feels that she hates oppressively solicitous Harriett but has no idea why. Her sessions with her psychiatrist fail to heal her rage at her adoptive mother, an addict who abandoned her then returned only to disappear again and die an ugly death. Even worse, her attempts to recover her lost memory lead to an excruciatingly paced series of revelations. Val says Diana asked her to seduce Jonathan. Diana realizes that Cole, a fellow student in her watercolor class, isn’t the stranger she’d thought he was. Where can this maze of deceptions possibly end?

One of those rare thrillers whose answers are even more scarifying than its mysteries.

Pub Date: Nov. 10, 2020

ISBN: 978-1-64385-470-0

Page Count: 310

Publisher: Crooked Lane

Review Posted Online: Aug. 19, 2020

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 1, 2020

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While simplistic, it’s a serviceable starter for discussions of spectrum disorders with younger neurotypical audiences.

ISAAC AND HIS AMAZING ASPERGER SUPERPOWERS!

Isaac explains why he wears a mask and cape and sometimes has special needs.

Packaged between rainbow-striped endpapers, this purposeful monologue offers a mix of positive takes—“I’ve got special superpowers that make me slightly different from my brother and the other kids at school”—and coping strategies. Among these latter are looking at foreheads rather than directly at eyes, which makes him “feel scared,” and keeping personal comments “inside my head so that I don’t upset people.” In the big, simple illustrations, Walsh gives Isaac uniformly smiling pets and peers for company, and she shows him less than cheerful only once, when the buzzing of fluorescent lights “makes my ears really hurt.” At the end he explains that he has Asperger’s, “which is a kind of autism,” and closes by affirming that his brother understands him, “and now you do too!” That may be overstating the case, but Isaac comes off as less inscrutable than the children in Gail Watts’ Kevin Thinks (2012) or Davene Fahy and Carol Inouye’s Anthony Best (2013). That the book is aimed not at children on the spectrum but at their peers is made explicit in a jacket-flap note from the author, whose son has Asperger’s.

While simplistic, it’s a serviceable starter for discussions of spectrum disorders with younger neurotypical audiences. (URL list) (Picture book. 6-8)

Pub Date: March 22, 2016

ISBN: 978-0-7636-8121-0

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Candlewick

Review Posted Online: Jan. 9, 2016

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 15, 2016

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