As an aid to teach empathy and cooperation to the under-4 set, this is an excellent addition to a parent or caregiver’s...

READ REVIEW

LET'S GO TO PLAYGROUP!

A multiracial cast of self-directing toddlers play, problem-solve, share snacks, and yes, cry over spilt milk without any apparent adult intervention or assistance.

Grown-ups are featured only as they drop the kids off or pick them up. The rhyming text follows tots Bee (a little black girl) and Billy (a little white boy) through various crises along with the other denizens of this diaper derby. “Someone’s got the tractor, / It’s little Baby Boo! / Bee shouts, / ‘MINE!’ / Then Baby cries, / Baby wants it, / too.” The verses’ length vary from a compact four-line stanza to a monumental 13-line opus. Some rhymes just beg to be read aloud with a mouth full of crackers. “Baby’s giggly, / smiley, dribbly, / Happy once again.” Tobia’s illustrations, created with pencil, ink, and digital media, are warmly and loudly evocative of fellow Briton Helen Oxenbury’s board books. The faces are round, the fingers are chubby, and the pajama-clad bottoms are amply padded. Bright colors enliven each boisterous scene. As an introduction to the nursery school/day care experience, Hart’s unnecessarily wordy story wades in midstream. As the children appear to know the routine as soon as they cross the threshold despite Billy’s moment of shyness, this assumes readers do, too.

As an aid to teach empathy and cooperation to the under-4 set, this is an excellent addition to a parent or caregiver’s bookshelf. (Picture book. 2-4)

Pub Date: March 1, 2017

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Kane Miller

Review Posted Online: Dec. 21, 2016

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 15, 2017

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet

A good choice for caregivers looking for a positive, uncomplicated introduction to a new baby that focuses on everything an...

I AM A BIG BROTHER

A little boy exults in his new role as big brother.

Rhyming text describes the arrival of a new baby and all of the big brother’s rewarding new duties. He gets to help with feedings, diaper changes, playtime, bathtime, and naptime. Though the rhyming couplets can sometimes feel a bit forced and awkward, the sentiment is sweet, as the focus here never veers from the excitement and love a little boy feels for his tiny new sibling. The charming, uncluttered illustrations convincingly depict the growing bond between this fair-skinned, rosy-cheeked, smiling pair of boys. In the final pages, the parents, heretofore kept mostly out of view, are pictured holding the children. The accompanying text reads: “Mommy, Daddy, baby, me. / We love each other—a family!” In companion volume I Am a Big Sister, the little boy is replaced with a little girl with bows in her hair. Some of the colors and patterns in the illustrations are slightly altered, but it is essentially the same title.

A good choice for caregivers looking for a positive, uncomplicated introduction to a new baby that focuses on everything an older sibling can do to help. (Board book. 2-4)

Pub Date: Jan. 27, 2015

ISBN: 978-0-545-68886-4

Page Count: 24

Publisher: Cartwheel/Scholastic

Review Posted Online: March 17, 2015

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 1, 2015

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet

Likely to be popular with young Pete the Cat fans and parents seeking a gentle introduction to preschool.

PETE THE KITTY'S FIRST DAY OF PRESCHOOL

From the Pete the Cat series

The popular character enjoys storytime, painting, and a snack on the very first day of preschool.

The younger incarnation of Pete the Cat packs his backpack that he picked out from the store himself, gets a snack from his mom, and rides the school bus with his big brother, Bob (who isn’t much bigger than Pete, sizewise). At school, Pete meets his stylish teacher, Mrs. Lopez, and fellow feline classmates while keeping his signature cool. The day ends with Pete declaring: “Preschool is awesome! Pete loves everything!” James Dean’s big-eyed cats populate the simply drawn scenes that look as though they were painted in preschool-esque fashion with thick swaths of tempera. At a couple of moments (when he eats his banana and declares it tasty and when he sings along) his customarily expressionless face actually breaks into a smile. Kimberly Dean’s text is uninspired, but it’s in sync with the upbeat tone of the series. Pete’s preschool experience, while not particularly realistic, is a highly positive one; refreshingly, there is no trace of the separation anxiety or anxiousness found in many first-day-of-school books.

Likely to be popular with young Pete the Cat fans and parents seeking a gentle introduction to preschool. (Board book. 2-4)

Pub Date: June 1, 2019

ISBN: 978-0-06243582-8

Page Count: 24

Publisher: HarperFestival

Review Posted Online: July 24, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 15, 2019

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet
more