A poorly designed atlas that reads more like propaganda than nonfiction.

FRIENDS AROUND THE WORLD ATLAS

A COMPASSIONATE APPROACH TO SEEING THE WORLD

A Christian guide to the world.

This atlas, developed by the Christian organization Compassion International, focuses on a handful of countries around the world served by this faith-based nonprofit. The book is organized by continent, and each country has a set of illustrated maps and photographs of children who are presumably participants in the programs Compassion International funds, although this is never specified. The images and text highlight regional poverty—such as the photo of half-clothed children gathered on the sidewalk in what looks like a slum in Haiti or the accompanying facts about the lack of access to education and economic security—thereby describing each nation from a deficit perspective. Even the opening questions, which are supposed to help readers make connections between themselves and other children around the world, are phrased poorly, including details that derail the focus from children’s ingenuity to their poverty, such as the fact that children in Kenya make shoes from “worn-out tires.” Additionally, many of the observations seem to come from a Western perspective, such as the question of what “language” (singular) children speak, something that would never be asked in a multilingual household in many of the countries featured in this book. The book not only lacks depth, but also scope: It covers only 25 countries, none of which are in Europe. The omission further highlights the underlying message that countries in the global south are underdeveloped and ignores an important opportunity to make connections between Western imperialism and current conditions.

A poorly designed atlas that reads more like propaganda than nonfiction. (Nonfiction. 8-14)

Pub Date: Sept. 3, 2019

ISBN: 978-1-4964-2421-1

Page Count: 72

Publisher: Tyndale House

Review Posted Online: July 14, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 1, 2019

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Go adventuring with a better guide.

50 ADVENTURES IN THE 50 STATES

From the The 50 States series

Find something to do in every state in the U.S.A.!

This guide highlights a location of interest within each of the states, therefore excluding Washington, D.C., and the territories. Trivia about each location is scattered across crisply rendered landscapes that background each state’s double-page spread while diminutive, diverse characters populate the scenes. Befitting the title, one “adventure” is presented per state, such as shrimping in Louisiana’s bayous, snowshoeing in Connecticut, or celebrating the Fourth of July in Boston. While some are stereotypical gimmes (surfing in California), others have the virtue of novelty, at least for this audience, such as viewing the sandhill crane migration in Nebraska. Within this thematic unity, some details go astray, and readers may find themselves searching in vain for animals mentioned. The trivia is plentiful but may be misleading, vague, or incorrect. Information about the Native American peoples of the area is often included, but its brevity—especially regarding sacred locations—means readers are floundering without sufficient context. The same is true for many of the facts that relate directly to expansion and colonialism, such as the unexplained near extinction of bison. Describing the genealogical oral history of South Carolina’s Gullah community as “spin[ning] tales” is equally brusque and offensive. The book tries to do a lot, but it is more style than substance, which may leave readers bored, confused, slightly annoyed—or all three. (This book was reviewed digitally with 12.2-by-20.2-inch double-page spreads viewed at 80% of actual size.)

Go adventuring with a better guide. (tips on local adventuring, index) (Nonfiction. 8-10)

Pub Date: Oct. 6, 2020

ISBN: 978-0-7112-5445-9

Page Count: 112

Publisher: Wide Eyed Editions

Review Posted Online: July 28, 2020

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 15, 2020

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A good if limited starting guide.

THE KIDS' FAMILY TREE BOOK

Author Leavitt presents all the components of doing research into family history with easy-to-follow directions for a successful project.

The volume begins with clear definitions about genealogy and why it is important to study. It moves on to give practical tips on getting started and how to map a family tree. It introduces young readers to the important documents that can assist in gathering family facts and describes the information they provide. It gives solid directions for setting up interviews with family members and how to reach out to those who are far away. This is followed up with strategies for using online resources, including warnings on how to stay safe on social media. The work of tracing ancestors from their countries of origin can be daunting, but Leavitt gives some help in this area as well and explores the role geography can play in family stories. There is good advice for collecting oral histories, and the chapter on exploring “The Way They Were” will appeal to many, as will the concluding chapters on family reunions and keeping in touch. All of this is presented in an encouraging, upbeat tone. Sidebars, charts, illustrations, and photographs add to the accessibility. The major drawback is that it assumes a known biological lineage with heterosexual parentage; there is no mention of the unique issues adopted children and nontraditional families might have in trying to put some of the instructions into practice. A short section addresses the challenges that face African-American descendants of enslaved people.

A good if limited starting guide. (resources, index) (Nonfiction. 8-12)

Pub Date: Oct. 10, 2017

ISBN: 978-1-4549-2320-6

Page Count: 128

Publisher: Sterling

Review Posted Online: Sept. 18, 2017

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Oct. 1, 2017

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