Emergent readers will quickly learn the text and tell their own tales of the duo’s adventures.

READ REVIEW

THE SASQUATCH AND THE LUMBERJACK

Strangers in the woods become friends.

A sasquatch who’s wearing red high-tops and carrying a camera meets a gray-bearded, flannel-wearing lumberjack: “STRANGERS.” That doesn’t last long. In the “autumn” they “forage” for mushrooms and “pick” apples. In the “winter” they skate and go ice fishing, “climb” a mountain, and “slide” down the other side. In the “spring” they “hike” and “roast” marshmallows, and they ride a tandem “bike.” And in the “summer” they “swim” and “float” lazily on a lake…and by the end, they are, of course, best “friends.” This quietly adventurous tale of a growing friendship between two unlikely buddies begins on the front endpapers with the characters in photos by themselves. Over the course of 15 full-bleed, double-page spreads, each with only one word, set in all capital letters, the two build their friendship in the forest. Two tiny friends, a bumblebee and a mouse, go along for the ride. And the closing endpapers are graced with selfies of the duo having fun together. Graphic novelist Sheridan’s simple tale of friendship is also a love note to the great outdoors. The colorfully muted illustrations are varied in perspective and full of humor (a surfing sasquatch in a wetsuit with an octopus on its back?!). The lumberjack is white; the sasquatch’s fur is rust-colored.

Emergent readers will quickly learn the text and tell their own tales of the duo’s adventures. (Picture book. 2-7)

Pub Date: May 22, 2018

ISBN: 978-1-63217-161-0

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Little Bigfoot/Sasquatch

Review Posted Online: March 27, 2018

Kirkus Reviews Issue: April 15, 2018

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet

A pro-girl book with illustrations that far outshine the text. (Picture book. 3-7)

I AM ENOUGH

A feel-good book about self-acceptance.

Empire star Byers and Bobo offer a beautifully illustrated, rhyming picture book detailing what one brown-skinned little girl with an impressive Afro appreciates about herself. Relying on similes, the text establishes a pattern with the opening sentence, “Like the sun, I’m here to shine,” and follows it through most of the book. Some of them work well, while others fall flat: “Like the rain, I’m here to pour / and drip and fall until I’m full.” In some vignettes she’s by herself; and in others, pictured along with children of other races. While the book’s pro-diversity message comes through, the didactic and even prideful expressions of self-acceptance make the book exasperatingly preachy—a common pitfall for books by celebrity authors. In contrast, Bobo’s illustrations are visually stunning. After painting the children and the objects with which they interact, such as flowers, books, and a red wagon, in acrylic on board for a traditional look, she scanned the images into Adobe Photoshop and added the backgrounds digitally in chalk. This lends a whimsical feel to such details as a rainbow, a window, wind, and rain—all reminiscent of Harold and the Purple Crayon. Bobo creates an inclusive world of girls in which wearing glasses, using a wheelchair, wearing a head scarf, and having a big Afro are unconditionally accepted rather than markers for othering.

A pro-girl book with illustrations that far outshine the text. (Picture book. 3-7)

Pub Date: March 6, 2018

ISBN: 978-0-06-266712-0

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Balzer + Bray/HarperCollins

Review Posted Online: Dec. 3, 2017

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 15, 2018

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet

Parents of toddlers starting school or day care should seek separation-anxiety remedies elsewhere, and fans of the original...

A KISSING HAND FOR CHESTER RACCOON

From the Kissing Hand series

A sweetened, condensed version of the best-selling picture book, The Kissing Hand.

As in the original, Chester Raccoon is nervous about attending Owl’s night school (raccoons are nocturnal). His mom kisses him on the paw and reminds him, “With a Kissing Hand… / We’ll never be apart.” The text boils the story down to its key elements, causing this version to feel rushed. Gone is the list of fun things Chester will get to do at school. Fans of the original may be disappointed that this board edition uses a different illustrator. Gibson’s work is equally sentimental, but her renderings are stiff and flat in comparison to the watercolors of Harper and Leak. Very young readers will probably not understand that Owl’s tree, filled with opossums, a squirrel, a chipmunk and others, is supposed to be a school.

Parents of toddlers starting school or day care should seek separation-anxiety remedies elsewhere, and fans of the original shouldn’t look to this version as replacement for their page-worn copies. (Board book. 2-4)

Pub Date: April 1, 2014

ISBN: 978-1-933718-77-4

Page Count: 14

Publisher: Tanglewood Publishing

Review Posted Online: May 19, 2014

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 1, 2014

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet
more