UNWARRANTED by Barry Friedman
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Feb. 21, 2017

"At once creative and conservative, Friedman offers a timely blueprint for recovering democratic control of local and national law enforcement."
A law professor diagnoses the ills of American policing and prescribes a healthy dose of sunlight. Read full book review >
WHY I AM NOT A FEMINIST by Jessa Crispin
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 21, 2017

"Forget busting glass ceilings. Crispin has taken a wrecking ball to the whole structure."
A taut and spirited attack on contemporary mainstream feminism. Read full book review >

CAPTURED by Sheldon Whitehouse
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 21, 2017

"The book reads more like a Democrat's attack on Republicans, but many of the ills it illuminates are bipartisan."
A United States senator argues that "there is virtually no element of the political landscape into which corporate influence has not intruded." Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 21, 2017

"A jargon-heavy, superficial primer on altered states tuned to a specific audience."
Two researchers survey the various ways that human beings alter their consciousness to improve performance. Read full book review >
FAST-FOOD KIDS by Amy L. Best
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 28, 2017

"The book may be useful for sociology teachers and students, but general readers and policymakers will find this tough to digest."
A cultural analysis of what kids eat and why. Read full book review >

THE COMPLACENT CLASS by Tyler Cowen
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 28, 2017

"A book that will undoubtedly stir discussion—as many of Cowen's books do—with readers divided about how they stand based on where they currently sit."
An influential economist seeks to persuade readers that American citizens have gotten overly complacent, that a crisis point is near, and that a widespread rebellion may alter the existing order. Read full book review >
THE HOME THAT WAS OUR COUNTRY by Alia Malek
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 28, 2017

"Provocative, richly detailed reading."
A Syrian-American journalist/civil rights lawyer interweaves narratives about her family with the history of modern Syria. Read full book review >
LOWER ED by Tressie McMillan Cottom
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 28, 2017

"Cottom does a good job of making the name 'Lower Ed' stick, and she makes a solid case for reviewing the entire system of higher education for openness of opportunity."
An informal sociological study of diploma mills and their often ripped-off discontents. Read full book review >
A COUNTRY BETWEEN by Stephanie Saldaña
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 1, 2017

"A serene memoir in which the author takes valuable time to regard the character of the Palestinian people and their way of life."
Reflections of a young American wife and mother trying to make a home in war-torn Jerusalem. Read full book review >
THE GIRL AT THE BAGGAGE CLAIM by Gish Jen
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 1, 2017

"While Jen's findings are undoubtedly intriguing, she is not fully convincing in her portrayal of the modest, hardworking flexi-self and the big pit self 'with high self-esteem and a lack of stick-to-it-ness.'"
A Chinese-American novelist and essayist investigates how culture shapes identity. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 1, 2017

"A sharp analysis of an increasingly pressing problem, but Nichols falls short of proposing a satisfying solution."
Some fresh twists on a familiar theme: the dumbing down of America amid the defiant distrust of expertise. Read full book review >
THE DEATH AND LIFE OF THE GREAT LAKES by Dan Egan
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 7, 2017

"Not light reading but essential for policymakers—and highly recommended for the 40 million people who rely on the Great Lakes for drinking water."
An alarming account of the "slow-motion catastrophe" facing the world's largest freshwater system. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Kathleen Kent
author of THE DIME
February 14, 2017

Dallas, Texas is not for the faint of heart. Good thing for Betty Rhyzyk she's from a family of take-no-prisoners Brooklyn police detectives. But in Kathleen Kent’s new novel The Dime, her Big Apple wisdom will only get her so far when she relocates to The Big D, where Mexican drug cartels and cult leaders, deadbeat skells and society wives all battle for sunbaked turf. Betty is as tough as the best of them, but she's deeply shaken when her first investigation goes sideways. Battling a group of unruly subordinates, a persistent stalker, a formidable criminal organization, and an unsupportive girlfriend, the unbreakable Detective Betty Rhyzyk may be reaching her limit. “Violent, sexy, and completely absorbing,” our critic writes in a starred review. “Kent's detective is Sam Spade reincarnated—as a brilliant, modern woman.” View video >