A COUNTRY BETWEEN by Stephanie Saldaña
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 1, 2017

"A serene memoir in which the author takes valuable time to regard the character of the Palestinian people and their way of life."
Reflections of a young American wife and mother trying to make a home in war-torn Jerusalem. Read full book review >
THE GIRL AT THE BAGGAGE CLAIM by Gish Jen
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 1, 2017

"While Jen's findings are undoubtedly intriguing, she is not fully convincing in her portrayal of the modest, hardworking flexi-self and the big pit self 'with high self-esteem and a lack of stick-to-it-ness.'"
A Chinese-American novelist and essayist investigates how culture shapes identity. Read full book review >

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 1, 2017

"A sharp analysis of an increasingly pressing problem, but Nichols falls short of proposing a satisfying solution."
Some fresh twists on a familiar theme: the dumbing down of America amid the defiant distrust of expertise. Read full book review >
THE DEATH AND LIFE OF THE GREAT LAKES by Dan Egan
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 7, 2017

"Not light reading but essential for policymakers—and highly recommended for the 40 million people who rely on the Great Lakes for drinking water."
An alarming account of the "slow-motion catastrophe" facing the world's largest freshwater system. Read full book review >
A GENERATION OF SOCIOPATHS by Bruce Cannon Gibney
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 7, 2017

"'This is a deeply negative portrayal, but a certain negativity may be what's required.' Maybe so, but if this polemic makes wounded millennials feel better, it likely won't reach older ears, who may be more sympathetic than Gibney imagines."
A cri de coeur against baby boomers, who "unraveled the social fabric woven by previous generations in the interests of sheer selfishness." Read full book review >

INFERNO by Steven Hatch
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 7, 2017

"Despite occasional long-windedness, Hatch's analysis is intelligent, nuanced, and tempered, a necessary departure from the panicked response of most American media outlets."
An American doctor describes his experiences in Liberia during the 2014-2015 Ebola epidemic. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 7, 2017

"A gripping chronicle by a daring pilot with an indomitable spirit."
A memoir from an Air National Guard pilot who was shot down on a search-and-rescue mission during her third tour of duty in Afghanistan. Read full book review >
HOW TO KILL A CITY by Peter Moskowitz
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 7, 2017

"A harsh critic of the forces changing urban life paints a vivid and grim picture of the future of American cities."
A freelance journalist reveals the many evils of gentrification. Read full book review >
NO FRIENDS BUT THE MOUNTAINS by Judith Matloff
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 7, 2017

"A tightly focused study of mountain societies that hints at future conflicts."
A veteran journalist drops into the highest hotspots across the globe for a sobering account of why mountainous regions often engender violence. Read full book review >
ANATOMY OF INNOCENCE by Laura Caldwell
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 7, 2017

"A searing, unforgettable anthology, with valuable insights provided at the end of each chapter by the editors."
A unique collection of 15 wrongful conviction sagas bound to shake faith in the American criminal justice system. Read full book review >
THE OPTIMISTIC LEFTIST by Ruy Teixeira
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 7, 2017

"A useful political book that makes it hard to understand how Donald Trump could have possibly won the election."
A political analyst offers American liberals a host of reasons to be cheerful. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 7, 2017

"Though replete with engaging vignettes, Erzen's work is too narrowly focused and unrevealing."
Erzen (Religion and Gender Studies/Univ. of Puget Sound; Fanpire: The Twilight Saga and the Women Who Love It, 2012, etc.) examines the rise of ministries in some of America's largest prison systems, critiquing their motives and effectiveness. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Yoojin Grace Wuertz
February 27, 2017

In Yoojin Grace Wuertz’s debut novel Everything Belongs to Us, the setting is Seoul in 1978. At South Korea’s top university, the nation’s best and brightest compete to join the professional elite of an authoritarian regime. Success could lead to a life of rarefied privilege and wealth; failure means being left irrevocably behind. For childhood friends Jisun and Namin, the stakes couldn’t be more different. Jisun, the daughter of a powerful business mogul, grew up on a mountainside estate with lush gardens and a dedicated chauffeur. Namin’s parents run a tented food cart from dawn to curfew; her sister works in a shoe factory. Now Jisun wants as little to do with her father’s world as possible, abandoning her schoolwork in favor of the underground activist movement, while Namin studies tirelessly in the service of one goal: to launch herself and her family out of poverty. But everything changes when Jisun and Namin meet an ambitious, charming student named Sunam, whose need to please his family has led him to a prestigious club: the Circle. Under the influence of his mentor, Juno, a manipulative social climber, Sunam becomes entangled with both women, as they all make choices that will change their lives forever. “Engrossing,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. “Wuertz is an important new voice in American fiction.” View video >