Readers looking to strengthen the relationship between the self and the outside world will find this book useful and...

READ REVIEW

Painting the Landscape of Your Soul

A JOURNEY OF SELF-DISCOVERY

A step-by-step guide to uncovering one’s inner artist and, in the process, healing one’s psychic wounds. 

When one is a child, one has access to the unlimited power of creativity, and one can express oneself in art and writing and song without judgment. But when downbeat inner and outer voices get loud enough, argues debut author Celebre, one can end up abandoning the self inside and its profound connections to the world. There is, however, a cure: as practicing shaman Sandra Ingerman writes in her foreword, “Using the creative process as the foundation for self-discovery, you will learn to override limiting beliefs of your mind, connect to unlimited possibilities, establish a deep sense of trust with your intuition, and then learn to listen and follow your intuitive voice.” Celebre guides readers along this path by dividing her book into four sections: “Roots and Bones,” “Let Your Creative Soul Fly,” “Creative Alchemy,” and “Spreading the Joy,” each designed to help the reader further uncover the artist within. In the first section, for example, the author suggests starting with a “body scan” in order to ground the mind in the physical, and recognize when a feeling or thought is true and right. Throughout the book, Celebre offers exercises to “reclaim” one’s connection to oneself and the universe, as well as brief asides on the history of intuitive painting and her own creative journey. Although readers may think they know what the words “body,” “mind,” and “spirit” mean, Celebre gives helpful definitions that illuminate her philosophy (“Body,” she says, encompasses the “Chakra, meridians, and nerve plexus” as well as the expected “organs, bones, muscles, cells”). Quotes from figures as diverse as Rumi, René Descartes, and Ellen DeGeneres are strewn throughout the text, which demonstrate the universality of the author’s message of self-discovery. 

Readers looking to strengthen the relationship between the self and the outside world will find this book useful and liberating. 

Pub Date: Nov. 1, 2014

ISBN: 978-0-9906778-0-2

Page Count: 318

Publisher: Brushheart Press

Review Posted Online: Aug. 19, 2015

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Stricter than, say, Bergen Evans or W3 ("disinterested" means impartial — period), Strunk is in the last analysis...

THE ELEMENTS OF STYLE

50TH ANNIVERSARY EDITION

Privately published by Strunk of Cornell in 1918 and revised by his student E. B. White in 1959, that "little book" is back again with more White updatings.

Stricter than, say, Bergen Evans or W3 ("disinterested" means impartial — period), Strunk is in the last analysis (whoops — "A bankrupt expression") a unique guide (which means "without like or equal").

Pub Date: May 15, 1972

ISBN: 0205632645

Page Count: 105

Publisher: Macmillan

Review Posted Online: Oct. 28, 2011

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 1972

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Analyzing his craft, a careful craftsman urges with Thoreauvian conviction that writers should simplify, simplify, simplify.

SEVERAL SHORT SENTENCES ABOUT WRITING

New York Times columnist and editorial board member delivers a slim book for aspiring writers, offering saws and sense, wisdom and waggery, biases and biting sarcasm.

Klinkenborg (Timothy; or, Notes of an Abject Reptile, 2006), who’s taught for decades, endeavors to keep things simple in his prose, and he urges other writers to do the same. (Note: He despises abuses of the word as, as he continually reminds readers.) In the early sections, the author ignores traditional paragraphing so that the text resembles a long free-verse poem. He urges readers to use short, clear sentences and to make sure each one is healthy before moving on; notes that it’s acceptable to start sentences with and and but; sees benefits in diagramming sentences; stresses that all writing is revision; periodically blasts the formulaic writing that many (most?) students learn in school; argues that knowing where you’re headed before you begin might be good for a vacation, but not for a piece of writing; and believes that writers must trust readers more, and trust themselves. Most of Klinkenborg’s advice is neither radical nor especially profound (“Turn to the poets. / Learn from them”), and the text suffers from a corrosive fallacy: that if his strategies work for him they will work for all. The final fifth of the text includes some passages from writers he admires (McPhee, Oates, Cheever) and some of his students’ awkward sentences, which he treats analytically but sometimes with a surprising sarcasm that veers near meanness. He includes examples of students’ dangling modifiers, malapropisms, errors of pronoun agreement, wordiness and other mistakes.

Analyzing his craft, a careful craftsman urges with Thoreauvian conviction that writers should simplify, simplify, simplify.

Pub Date: Aug. 7, 2012

ISBN: 978-0-307-26634-7

Page Count: 224

Publisher: Knopf

Review Posted Online: May 14, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 15, 2012

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