Near the end of the book, a military officer says, “In the nonsense of war, everything makes sense.” Readers may find this...

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A WHALE IN PARIS

HOW IT HAPPENED THAT CHANTEL DUPREY BEFRIENDED A WHALE DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR & HELPED LIBERATE FRANCE

The most important part of this novel might be the recipe for salmon quiche.

The recipe sets the tone for the whole book, because it’s completely impractical: “While whistling, crack the eggs into a bowl and whip them with a fork….Do not throw away the eggshells! They can be used as tiny pots for starting plants from seeds.” It’s perhaps not too surprising that the minds that would dream up that recipe and put it in a historical novel would also tell the story of the Nazi occupation of Paris by writing about a whale who loves the ukulele. The whale is named Franklin, and he tends to pop out of the Seine when 12-year-old Chantal plays “Somewhere Over the Rainbow.” And yet, this fanciful, impossible animal fable often feels just as urgent as the real events. The book never hides the horrors of war. There are bombs and starvation and concentration camps. McGuire’s gray-toned illustrations help. They show mundane objects: fishing boots, a radio, a ukulele, but in this context, they become strangely enchanting. (Chantal is white, as depicted in the illustrations, and so are most of the other characters, who are either her relatives or connected to the German military.)

Near the end of the book, a military officer says, “In the nonsense of war, everything makes sense.” Readers may find this utterly ridiculous story utterly convincing and even sometimes heartbreaking. (Historical fantasy. 8-12)

Pub Date: May 22, 2018

ISBN: 978-1-5344-1915-5

Page Count: 256

Publisher: Atheneum

Review Posted Online: Feb. 13, 2018

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 1, 2018

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With Ivan’s movie out this year from Disney, expect great interest—it will be richly rewarded.

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THE ONE AND ONLY BOB

Tiny, sassy Bob the dog, friend of The One and Only Ivan (2012), returns to tell his tale.

Wisecracking Bob, who is a little bit Chihuahua among other things, now lives with his girl, Julia, and her parents. Happily, her father works at Wildworld Zoological Park and Sanctuary, the zoo where Bob’s two best friends, Ivan the gorilla and Ruby the elephant, live, so Bob gets to visit and catch up with them regularly. Due to an early betrayal, Bob doesn’t trust humans (most humans are good only for their thumbs); he fears he’s going soft living with Julia, and he’s certain he is a Bad Dog—as in “not a good representative of my species.” On a visit to the zoo with a storm threatening, Bob accidentally falls into the gorilla enclosure just as a tornado strikes. So that’s what it’s like to fly. In the storm’s aftermath, Bob proves to everyone (and finally himself) that there is a big heart in that tiny chest…and a brave one too. With this companion, Applegate picks up where her Newbery Medal winner left off, and fans will be overjoyed to ride along in the head of lovable, self-deprecating Bob on his storm-tossed adventure. His wry doggy observations and attitude are pitch perfect (augmented by the canine glossary and Castelao’s picture dictionary of dog postures found in the frontmatter). Gorilla Ivan described Julia as having straight, black hair in the previous title, and Castelao's illustrations in that volume showed her as pale-skinned. (Finished art not available for review.)

With Ivan’s movie out this year from Disney, expect great interest—it will be richly rewarded. (afterword) (Fiction. 8-12)

Pub Date: May 5, 2020

ISBN: 978-0-06-299131-7

Page Count: 352

Publisher: Harper/HarperCollins

Review Posted Online: March 25, 2020

Kirkus Reviews Issue: April 15, 2020

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Is this the end? Well, no…the series will stagger on through at least one more scheduled sequel.

CAPTAIN UNDERPANTS AND THE TERRIFYING RETURN OF TIPPY TINKLETROUSERS

From the Captain Underpants series , Vol. 9

Sure signs that the creative wells are running dry at last, the Captain’s ninth, overstuffed outing both recycles a villain (see Book 4) and offers trendy anti-bullying wish fulfillment.

Not that there aren’t pranks and envelope-pushing quips aplenty. To start, in an alternate ending to the previous episode, Principal Krupp ends up in prison (“…a lot like being a student at Jerome Horwitz Elementary School, except that the prison had better funding”). There, he witnesses fellow inmate Tippy Tinkletrousers (aka Professor Poopypants) escape in a giant Robo-Suit (later reduced to time-traveling trousers). The villain sets off after George and Harold, who are in juvie (“not much different from our old school…except that they have library books here.”). Cut to five years previous, in a prequel to the whole series. George and Harold link up in kindergarten to reduce a quartet of vicious bullies to giggling insanity with a relentless series of pranks involving shaving cream, spiders, effeminate spoof text messages and friendship bracelets. Pilkey tucks both topical jokes and bathroom humor into the cartoon art, and ups the narrative’s lexical ante with terms like “pharmaceuticals” and “theatrical flair.” Unfortunately, the bullies’ sad fates force Krupp to resign, so he’s not around to save the Earth from being destroyed later on by Talking Toilets and other invaders…

Is this the end? Well, no…the series will stagger on through at least one more scheduled sequel. (Fantasy. 10-12)

Pub Date: Aug. 28, 2012

ISBN: 978-0-545-17534-0

Page Count: 304

Publisher: Scholastic

Review Posted Online: June 20, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 15, 2012

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