A soundly researched, well-written approach to Alzheimer’s disease and cognitive impairment.

ALZHEIMER'S, MEMORY LOSS, AND MCI

THE LATEST SCIENCE FOR PREVENTION AND TREATMENT

Two authorities in longevity medicine provide a breakthrough approach to treating Alzheimer’s disease.

The philosophy underlying our inefficient and failing health care system is itself flawed. Formulated to deal with acute conditions through the application of “magic bullet” solutions, contemporary medicine fails to understand and effectively treat chronic conditions like Alzheimer’s disease. So argue doctors Leonardi and Daley who offer a thorough six-step approach to the disease that, they say, can prevent or treat both Mild Cognitive Impairment and Alzheimer’s. Leonardi and Daley use simple metaphors to explain the disease; they compare the brain’s overload of amyloid protein (one of the causes of Alzheimer’s) to “a sink with the faucet running and the drain blocked.” The doctors have obviously put much thought into how to talk to patients and caregivers clearly and compassionately. “The purpose of this book,” the authors write, “is to teach you what we teach our patients.” Their discussion of their treatment philosophy is also simple, but their methodology shows an expert’s understanding of this complex condition. Reduction of oxidants, “rustproofing,” improving genetic predisposition through food supplements, protecting and defending the brain, maintaining healthy hormone levels, engaging in “brain aerobics,” meditation and sound sleep: These are some of the topics covered to arm patients and caregivers with a multipronged approach. While many books that deal with Alzheimer’s accept the medical orthodoxy, this revolutionary patient-centered approach gives both patients and caregivers an arsenal of techniques to cope with MCI and Alzheimer’s disease. Written with clarity and precision, this book can provide a positive framework for patients, family and treatment specialists who are open to this thoughtful program.

A soundly researched, well-written approach to Alzheimer’s disease and cognitive impairment.

Pub Date: July 16, 2012

ISBN: 978-1470030476

Page Count: 192

Publisher: CreateSpace

Review Posted Online: Aug. 31, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Oct. 15, 2012

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The lessons to draw are obvious: Smoke more dope, eat less meat. Like-minded readers will dig it.

F*CK IT, I'LL START TOMORROW

The chef, rapper, and TV host serves up a blustery memoir with lashings of self-help.

“I’ve always had a sick confidence,” writes Bronson, ne Ariyan Arslani. The confidence, he adds, comes from numerous sources: being a New Yorker, and more specifically a New Yorker from Queens; being “short and fucking husky” and still game for a standoff on the basketball court; having strength, stamina, and seemingly no fear. All these things serve him well in the rough-and-tumble youth he describes, all stickball and steroids. Yet another confidence-builder: In the big city, you’ve got to sink or swim. “No one is just accepted—you have to fucking show that you’re able to roll,” he writes. In a narrative steeped in language that would make Lenny Bruce blush, Bronson recounts his sentimental education, schooled by immigrant Italian and Albanian family members and the mean streets, building habits good and bad. The virtue of those habits will depend on your take on modern mores. Bronson writes, for example, of “getting my dick pierced” down in the West Village, then grabbing a pizza and smoking weed. “I always smoke weed freely, always have and always will,” he writes. “I’ll just light a blunt anywhere.” Though he’s gone through the classic experiences of the latter-day stoner, flunking out and getting arrested numerous times, Bronson is a hard charger who’s not afraid to face nearly any challenge—especially, given his physique and genes, the necessity of losing weight: “If you’re husky, you’re always dieting in your mind,” he writes. Though vulgar and boastful, Bronson serves up a model that has plenty of good points, including his growing interest in nature, creativity, and the desire to “leave a legacy for everybody.”

The lessons to draw are obvious: Smoke more dope, eat less meat. Like-minded readers will dig it.

Pub Date: April 20, 2021

ISBN: 978-1-4197-4478-5

Page Count: 184

Publisher: Abrams

Review Posted Online: May 5, 2021

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 1, 2021

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Skloot's meticulous, riveting account strikes a humanistic balance between sociological history, venerable portraiture and...

THE IMMORTAL LIFE OF HENRIETTA LACKS

A dense, absorbing investigation into the medical community's exploitation of a dying woman and her family's struggle to salvage truth and dignity decades later.

In a well-paced, vibrant narrative, Popular Science contributor and Culture Dish blogger Skloot (Creative Writing/Univ. of Memphis) demonstrates that for every human cell put under a microscope, a complex life story is inexorably attached, to which doctors, researchers and laboratories have often been woefully insensitive and unaccountable. In 1951, Henrietta Lacks, an African-American mother of five, was diagnosed with what proved to be a fatal form of cervical cancer. At Johns Hopkins, the doctors harvested cells from her cervix without her permission and distributed them to labs around the globe, where they were multiplied and used for a diverse array of treatments. Known as HeLa cells, they became one of the world's most ubiquitous sources for medical research of everything from hormones, steroids and vitamins to gene mapping, in vitro fertilization, even the polio vaccine—all without the knowledge, must less consent, of the Lacks family. Skloot spent a decade interviewing every relative of Lacks she could find, excavating difficult memories and long-simmering outrage that had lay dormant since their loved one's sorrowful demise. Equal parts intimate biography and brutal clinical reportage, Skloot's graceful narrative adeptly navigates the wrenching Lack family recollections and the sobering, overarching realities of poverty and pre–civil-rights racism. The author's style is matched by a methodical scientific rigor and manifest expertise in the field.

Skloot's meticulous, riveting account strikes a humanistic balance between sociological history, venerable portraiture and Petri dish politics.

Pub Date: Feb. 9, 2010

ISBN: 978-1-4000-5217-2

Page Count: 320

Publisher: Crown

Review Posted Online: Dec. 22, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 1, 2010

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