Nice to see you again, David! (Picture book. 4-6)

READ REVIEW

GROW UP, DAVID!

As if he couldn’t get into trouble enough on his own, David has a big brother to “help.”

Returning to his hapless alter (?) ego after eight years (It’s Christmas, David!, 2010), Shannon brings his older sibling—or at least, to judge from the pictures, said sibling’s lower portions—into play for a series of moments captioned by phrases that will be ultrafamiliar to all but only children: “No, David!” “You’re too little.” “Stop following me!” “That’s mine!” Drawn as before in a loose style with visible corrections and mottled, garishly colored backgrounds, the illustrations capture both the emotional intensity of David’s roller-coaster world and, in hilarious close-up tableaux, a series of brotherly tussles, pranks, domestic disasters, and goofy bids for attention. Many of Caldecott honoree No, David!’s iconic illustrations are mirrored here, including some mild (if catastrophic for the plumbing) potty humor, a close-up of David’s wide-open, bawling mouth, and both brothers in timeout. Just to show that big bro’s not entirely a brat, after David wangles his way into a big kids’ football game and gets clobbered, he gets a noogie and a “Nice catch!” that give the end a note of rough affection. Both brothers present white.

Nice to see you again, David! (Picture book. 4-6)

Pub Date: Aug. 28, 2018

ISBN: 978-1-338-25097-8

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Blue Sky/Scholastic

Review Posted Online: July 16, 2018

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 1, 2018

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Should be packaged with an oxygen supply, as it will incontestably elicit uncontrollable gales of giggles.

THE DINKY DONKEY

Even more alliterative hanky-panky from the creators of The Wonky Donkey (2010).

Operating on the principle (valid, here) that anything worth doing is worth overdoing, Smith and Cowley give their wildly popular Wonky Donkey a daughter—who, being “cute and small,” was a “dinky donkey”; having “beautiful long eyelashes” she was in consequence a “blinky dinky donkey”; and so on…and on…and on until the cumulative chorus sails past silly and ludicrous to irresistibly hysterical: “She was a stinky funky plinky-plonky winky-tinky,” etc. The repeating “Hee Haw!” chorus hardly suggests what any audience’s escalating response will be. In the illustrations the daughter sports her parent’s big, shiny eyes and winsome grin while posing in a multicolored mohawk next to a rustic boombox (“She was a punky blinky”), painting her hooves pink, crossing her rear legs to signal a need to pee (“winky-tinky inky-pinky”), demonstrating her smelliness with the help of a histrionic hummingbird, and finally cozying up to her proud, evidently single parent (there’s no sign of another) for a closing cuddle.

Should be packaged with an oxygen supply, as it will incontestably elicit uncontrollable gales of giggles. (Picture book. 4-6)

Pub Date: Nov. 5, 2019

ISBN: 978-1-338-60083-4

Page Count: 24

Publisher: Scholastic

Review Posted Online: Oct. 13, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Nov. 1, 2019

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Although many readers will relate to being technology orphans, little else will entertain in this rather bland tale.

STICKY, STICKY, STUCK!

A well-intentioned effort with an extra-sweet ending may briefly satisfy but ultimately leaves readers wanting.

Little sister Annie is always getting sticky. A stuck lollipop on her nose, exploded bubble gum over her face, ice cream dripping down her arm and “marshmallow goop” clogged in her ears are Annie’s distractions while her family members ignore her. They are too addicted to their own vices—video games, cellphone, laptop and what looks to be an iPad—to pay her much attention other than to be annoyed at the messes she makes. “One day Annie was hungry and went looking for a snack. As usual, everyone was doing their own thing, and there was no one to help Annie.” In an attempt to solve her own problem, she creates a very sticky sandwich with peanut butter and honey. When Annie accidently falls onto her dog, she finds herself stuck to the surprised canine. One mishap after another causes each family member to get stuck as well, until they are all one exasperated heap. But Annie has an idea that requires everyone to pay attention to each other and work together. The fire department and a good deal of water follow, but Annie’s family is having too good a time to become “unstuck yet.” Björkman illustrates the antics but fails to add much to the text.

Although many readers will relate to being technology orphans, little else will entertain in this rather bland tale. (Picture book. 4-6)

Pub Date: June 1, 2013

ISBN: 978-0-06-199818-8

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Harper/HarperCollins

Review Posted Online: April 15, 2013

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 2013

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