Super Saurus’ imagination once again conquers a challenging situation.

READ REVIEW

SUPER SAURUS AND THE EGG

Having saved kindergarten (2017), Super Saurus tackles his next issue: his parents’ unhatched egg.

This kid’s imagination knows no bounds, so when faced with the uncertainty of a brother or a sister, he does the only thing he can: declare “Super Saurus works alone” and imagine that it’s the “EGG OF DOOM.” He’ll be ready no matter what hatches. His “Super Sun” will shrivel a “vampire-saurus,” his “Robot Ruster” will stop a “planet-crushing robot,” and Maud the Marauder will vamoose at the first sound from his “Bagpipe Blaster.” Super Saurus has to keep the egg close in order to immediately overpower whatever hatches, and despite his words to the contrary, his parents think it’s sweet how taken he is with the idea of being a big brother. When the inevitable happens, Super Saurus truly does vanquish the tot that hatches, but his little sister does some vanquishing of her own…and becomes a great sidekick: Super Goo. Young’s acrylic illustrations play up the dichotomy between Super Saurus’ fancies and, with the turn of a page, reality: Toys, a fish net, a flashlight, and bubbles are the common items that turn into his superhero tools (and that readers are likely to have as well). These dinos are sauropods, the parents with long necks. Super Saurus has blue hair like his dad’s, and Goo, blonde, like her mother’s.

Super Saurus’ imagination once again conquers a challenging situation. (Picture book. 4-8)

Pub Date: May 22, 2018

ISBN: 978-1-4231-7569-8

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Disney-Hyperion

Review Posted Online: March 18, 2018

Kirkus Reviews Issue: April 1, 2018

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A good choice for just those days when Mom and Dad do go away and leave their children in charge of Grandpa.

HOW TO BABYSIT A GRANDPA

From the How To... series

Reagan’s second outing is a tongue-in-cheek reversal of roles as a young boy instructs readers on how best to entertain and care for a grandpa while Mom and Dad are away.

First, he instructs them to hide when Grandpa rings the doorbell—resist the wiggles and giggles, and only pop out when he gives up. Then, reassure him that Mom and Dad will be back and distract him with a snack—heavy on the ice cream, cookies, ketchup and olives. Throughout the day, the narrator takes his grandpa for a walk, entertains him, plays with him, puts him down for a nap and encourages him to clean up before Mom and Dad’s return. Lists on almost every spread give readers a range of ideas for things to try, provided their grandfathers are not diabetic or arthritic, or have high blood pressure or a heart condition. These lists also provide Wildish with lots of fodder for his vignette illustrations. His digital artwork definitely focuses on the humor, with laugh-out-loud scenes and funny hidden details. And his characters’ expressive faces also help to fill in the grandfather-grandson relationship that Reagan's deadpan narrative leaves unstated.

A good choice for just those days when Mom and Dad do go away and leave their children in charge of Grandpa. (Picture book. 4-8)

Pub Date: April 10, 2012

ISBN: 978-0-375-86713-2

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Knopf

Review Posted Online: Feb. 5, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Feb. 15, 2012

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Should be packaged with an oxygen supply, as it will incontestably elicit uncontrollable gales of giggles.

THE DINKY DONKEY

Even more alliterative hanky-panky from the creators of The Wonky Donkey (2010).

Operating on the principle (valid, here) that anything worth doing is worth overdoing, Smith and Cowley give their wildly popular Wonky Donkey a daughter—who, being “cute and small,” was a “dinky donkey”; having “beautiful long eyelashes” she was in consequence a “blinky dinky donkey”; and so on…and on…and on until the cumulative chorus sails past silly and ludicrous to irresistibly hysterical: “She was a stinky funky plinky-plonky winky-tinky,” etc. The repeating “Hee Haw!” chorus hardly suggests what any audience’s escalating response will be. In the illustrations the daughter sports her parent’s big, shiny eyes and winsome grin while posing in a multicolored mohawk next to a rustic boombox (“She was a punky blinky”), painting her hooves pink, crossing her rear legs to signal a need to pee (“winky-tinky inky-pinky”), demonstrating her smelliness with the help of a histrionic hummingbird, and finally cozying up to her proud, evidently single parent (there’s no sign of another) for a closing cuddle.

Should be packaged with an oxygen supply, as it will incontestably elicit uncontrollable gales of giggles. (Picture book. 4-6)

Pub Date: Nov. 5, 2019

ISBN: 978-1-338-60083-4

Page Count: 24

Publisher: Scholastic

Review Posted Online: Oct. 13, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Nov. 1, 2019

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