BRAVING THE NEW WORLD, 1619-1784

FROM THE ARRIVAL OF THE ENSLAVED AFRICANS TO THE END OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

Covering African-American history from 1619 to 1784, this book (part of a 16-volume black history series) deals chiefly with how slavery started in America. Nardo (Vitamins and Minerals, not reviewed, etc.) explains that the 15th-century Portuguese and Spanish first brought African slaves to the New World to work on Caribbean and South American sugar plantations, while North American colonists relied on white indentured servants. Later, English economic conditions encouraged a shift to slavery in the British colonies, just as the plantation system boomed in the South. Nardo draws cause-and-effect relationships, noting that, for example, African-American mothers, following white custom, weaned their infants earlier than their Caribbean counterparts did, and thus had more children, increasing the black population so rapidly that white racial fear mushroomed. The author's prose is objective, sometimes too academic; the illustrations, mostly historical prints, are often peripheral to the account, but every once in a while there's an unforgettable image, like the diagram of how many tiny black figures (lying down in chains) could be crammed onto a slave ship. A balanced, thoughtful look at history. (Illustrations; index; time line) (Nonfiction. 12+)

Pub Date: Dec. 1, 1994

ISBN: 0-7910-2259-5

Page Count: 118

Publisher: N/A

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Dec. 15, 1994

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A powerful reminder of a history that is all too timely today.

THEY CALLED US ENEMY

A beautifully heart-wrenching graphic-novel adaptation of actor and activist Takei’s (Lions and Tigers and Bears, 2013, etc.) childhood experience of incarceration in a World War II camp for Japanese Americans.

Takei had not yet started school when he, his parents, and his younger siblings were forced to leave their home and report to the Santa Anita Racetrack for “processing and removal” due to President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s Executive Order 9066. The creators smoothly and cleverly embed the historical context within which Takei’s family’s story takes place, allowing readers to simultaneously experience the daily humiliations that they suffered in the camps while providing readers with a broader understanding of the federal legislation, lawsuits, and actions which led to and maintained this injustice. The heroes who fought against this and provided support to and within the Japanese American community, such as Fred Korematsu, the 442nd Regiment, Herbert Nicholson, and the ACLU’s Wayne Collins, are also highlighted, but the focus always remains on the many sacrifices that Takei’s parents made to ensure the safety and survival of their family while shielding their children from knowing the depths of the hatred they faced and danger they were in. The creators also highlight the dangerous parallels between the hate speech, stereotyping, and legislation used against Japanese Americans and the trajectory of current events. Delicate grayscale illustrations effectively convey the intense emotions and the stark living conditions.

A powerful reminder of a history that is all too timely today. (Graphic memoir. 14-adult)

Pub Date: July 16, 2019

ISBN: 978-1-60309-450-4

Page Count: 208

Publisher: Top Shelf Books

Review Posted Online: Aug. 5, 2019

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Inspirational reading for any occasion. (Poetry. 12-adult)

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FOR EVERY ONE

A poem provides hope and reassurance to teens as they try to make sense of their own dreams for the future.

Award-winning writer Reynolds (Long Way Down, 2017, etc.) offers a letter in the form of a long poem that acknowledges and encourages young people’s dreams and aspirations. The poem uses the author’s own experiences to show common ground with his readers, making it clear that he is presenting himself as a fellow traveler on the journey: “This letter / is being written / from the inside. / From the front line / and the fault line. / From the uncertain thick of it all.” He shares observations of others and the ways in which they coped and speaks of the futility of finding answers in the usual places: “Though the struggle / is always made to / sound admirable / and poetic, / the thumping uncertainty / is still there.” This short piece is full of the elements that make Reynolds such a successful writer: honesty, rich imagery, great facility with language, and an irresistible cadence. At times conversational, other times, uplifting, this intimate and powerful piece connects on many levels. Even as Reynolds repeats throughout the poem, “I don’t know nothing about that,” he is telling his readers a great deal. As a piece that was originally performed, this begs to be heard. However, the printed version will still resonate.

Inspirational reading for any occasion. (Poetry. 12-adult)

Pub Date: April 10, 2018

ISBN: 978-1-4814-8624-8

Page Count: 112

Publisher: Caitlyn Dlouhy/Atheneum

Review Posted Online: Feb. 5, 2018

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Feb. 15, 2018

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