Thoughtful, fun, and delightful.

ICE!

POEMS ABOUT POLAR LIFE

Meet the animals and landscapes of the Arctic and Antarctica.

Poems in a lilting meter provide insight about the Arctic or Antarctica or one of each region’s unique animals, with a bit of interesting information included. There are lots of surprises in the inventive wordplay along with twisted syntax that gets the point across while invoking giggles from young readers. The leadoff verse introduces both regions as remote and farthest from the equator, calling their frosty climates “an Earth refrigerator.” Krill is the food choice of many polar sea animals, eaten by “Millions! Billions! Trillions! Krillions!” The narwhal with its front-end spear is “very hard to ignar!” The silent P in ptarmigan is carried throughout the poem as “it ptoddles on the ptundra.” Notes containing fascinating facts about habitats, food sources, predators, and more enhance the poems and just might lead to further investigation by readers. Some serious issues regarding climate change and other endangering problems are addressed as well. Full-page illustrations, rendered in colored pencil and pastel, accompany the verses and capture the essence of each creature with great imagination and childlike innocence. Color abounds, not only in the illustrations, but also with bright blocks of orange, purple, blue, yellow and more that background the poems. Florian is a master of light verse with a purpose, and he matches it with art that charms.

Thoughtful, fun, and delightful. (bibliography) (Picture book/poetry. 6-9)

Pub Date: Dec. 1, 2020

ISBN: 978-0-8234-4101-3

Page Count: 48

Publisher: Holiday House

Review Posted Online: Oct. 13, 2020

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Nov. 1, 2020

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In spite of the book’s flaws, dragons are very appealing, and tales for young audiences that model the scientific method are...

DRAGONS AND MARSHMALLOWS

From the Zoey and Sassafras series , Vol. 1

Zoey discovers that she can see magical creatures that might need her help.

That’s a good thing because her mother has been caring for the various beasts since childhood, but now she’s leaving on a business trip so the work will fall to Zoey. Most people (like Zoey’s father) can’t see the magical creatures, so Zoey, who appears in illustrations to be black, will have to experiment with their care by problem-solving using the scientific method to determine appropriate treatment and feeding. When a tiny, sick dragon shows up on her doorstep, she runs an experiment and determines that marshmallows appear to be the proper food. Unfortunately, she hadn’t done enough research beforehand to understand that although dragons might like marshmallows, they might not be the best food for a sick, fire-breathing baby. Although the incorporation of important STEM behaviors is a plus, the exposition is mildly clunky, with little character development and stilted dialogue. Many pages are dense with large-print text, related in Zoey’s not especially childlike voice. However, the inclusion in each chapter of a couple of attractive black-and-white illustrations of round-faced people and Zoey’s mischievous cat helps break up the narrative.

In spite of the book’s flaws, dragons are very appealing, and tales for young audiences that model the scientific method are nice to see. (Fantasy. 6-9)

Pub Date: March 14, 2017

ISBN: 978-1-943147-08-3

Page Count: 96

Publisher: The Innovation Press

Review Posted Online: Dec. 19, 2016

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 1, 2017

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“It’s time to head back home,” the narrator concludes. “You’ve touched the Earth in so many ways.” Who knew it would be so...

TOUCH THE EARTH

From the Julian Lennon White Feather Flier Adventure series , Vol. 1

A pro bono Twinkie of a book invites readers to fly off in a magic plane to bring clean water to our planet’s oceans, deserts, and brown children.

Following a confusingly phrased suggestion beneath a soft-focus world map to “touch the Earth. Now touch where you live,” a shake of the volume transforms it into a plane with eyes and feathered wings that flies with the press of a flat, gray “button” painted onto the page. Pressing like buttons along the journey releases a gush of fresh water from the ground—and later, illogically, provides a filtration device that changes water “from yucky to clean”—for thirsty groups of smiling, brown-skinned people. At other stops, a tap on the button will “help irrigate the desert,” and touching floating bottles and other debris in the ocean supposedly makes it all disappear so the fish can return. The 20 children Coh places on a globe toward the end are varied of skin tone, but three of the four young saviors she plants in the flier’s cockpit as audience stand-ins are white. The closing poem isn’t so openly parochial, though it seldom rises above vague feel-good sentiments: “Love the Earth, the moon and sun. / All the children can be one.”

“It’s time to head back home,” the narrator concludes. “You’ve touched the Earth in so many ways.” Who knew it would be so easy to clean the place up and give everyone a drink? (Picture book. 6-8)

Pub Date: April 11, 2017

ISBN: 978-1-5107-2083-1

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Sky Pony Press

Review Posted Online: Feb. 4, 2017

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Feb. 15, 2017

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