A sweet story that instructs parents as well as delighting babies. (Board book. 3-9 mos.)

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RED SOCKS

A little one hunts for a missing sock.

This quick board book loosely details the hunt for a missing red sock, but the real goal is expanding nascent vocal skills. A note for parents on the opening pages details the importance of constantly talking to babies, even when they can't respond. By listening to a constant narration of the day's activities, little ones will soak in all sorts of meanings, tones, and conversational patterns. The actual story’s text consists entirely of a mother’s narration of her laundry duties preparatory to a trip to the park. The mom and child pictured are Asian-American, and both are clearly delighted with each other; the baby’s giggling is almost audible. This is a book best read to the youngest of readers, as it’s designed for parents of babies that are barely cooing. A similar title, A Fish to Feed, goes one step up the developmental ladder and is aimed at those who can say a few words but not much else.

A sweet story that instructs parents as well as delighting babies. (Board book. 3-9 mos.)

Pub Date: June 25, 2015

ISBN: 978-1-59572-706-0

Page Count: 18

Publisher: Star Bright

Review Posted Online: June 16, 2015

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 1, 2015

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Positively refreshing.

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HAIR LOVE

A black girl helps her dad learn how to give her the perfect hairstyle for a very special day.

Zuri’s voluminous head of hair “has a mind of its own. It kinks, coils, and curls every which way.” She is pictured asleep with a large Afro framing her face. She is proud of her hair, which she sometimes wears in braids with beads like a princess and other times in pigtail puffs. But today is a special day. She knows Daddy is “worn-out” and probably needs a break, so she lets him sleep in while she looks up hairstyles on a tablet. When Daddy wakes and offers to help, he tries a series of hairstyles that just don’t work. Finally, Zuri grabs some hair supplies and shows him a tutorial. “Watching carefully… / Daddy combed, / parted, oiled, and twisted. / He nailed it!” Zuri is lovely and happy with her freshly done hairstyle, and when Mommy arrives to their “Welcome Home” sign, she loves Zuri’s look too. The digital illustrations feature details that feel just right: Zuri’s thick, textured hair, Daddy’s locs and tattoo, and dark-skinned Mom’s bright headwrap. While it’s unclear where Mommy is returning from (she is dressed casually and has a rolling black suitcase), this authentic depiction of a loving and whole black family broadens the scope of representation.

Positively refreshing. (Picture book. 4-9)

Pub Date: May 14, 2019

ISBN: 978-0-525-55336-6

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Kokila

Review Posted Online: March 3, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 15, 2019

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This celebration of cross-generational bonding is a textual and artistic tour de force.

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  • Newbery Medal Winner

  • Caldecott Honor Book

LAST STOP ON MARKET STREET

A young boy yearns for what he doesn’t have, but his nana teaches him to find beauty in what he has and can give, as well as in the city where they live.

CJ doesn’t want to wait in the rain or take the bus or go places after church. But through Nana’s playful imagination and gentle leadership, he begins to see each moment as an opportunity: Trees drink raindrops from straws; the bus breathes fire; and each person has a story to tell. On the bus, Nana inspires an impromptu concert, and CJ’s lifted into a daydream of colors and light, moon and magic. Later, when walking past broken streetlamps on the way to the soup kitchen, CJ notices a rainbow and thinks of his nana’s special gift to see “beautiful where he never even thought to look.” Through de la Peña’s brilliant text, readers can hear, feel and taste the city: its grit and beauty, its quiet moments of connectedness. Robinson’s exceptional artwork works with it to ensure that readers will fully understand CJ’s journey toward appreciation of the vibrant, fascinating fabric of the city. Loosely defined patterns and gestures offer an immediate and raw quality to the Sasek-like illustrations. Painted in a warm palette, this diverse urban neighborhood is imbued with interest and possibility.

This celebration of cross-generational bonding is a textual and artistic tour de force. (Picture book. 3-6)

Pub Date: Jan. 8, 2015

ISBN: 978-0-399-25774-2

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Putnam

Review Posted Online: Oct. 22, 2014

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Nov. 1, 2014

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