Mild in every way but language, this tale of privileged teens offers a fairly satisfying glimpse of an almost alternate...

THIS ADVENTURE ENDS

Many novels for teens tackle too much, but Mills goes another direction, focusing on Sloane's family and new friends to the virtual exclusion of school, work, and what readers are told is her passion for singing.

Fortunately, these friends are smarter, wittier, and way better looking than your average crew. Vera is a social media maven and a lesbian with a girlfriend in college; her twin, Gabe, is best friends with Remy, who just broke up with Aubrey; and then there's Frank, who has presence and sanctions parties. Sloane's father is a well-known novelist who has written popular books that have been made into movies. Writer's block has resulted in the family’s move from New York to this Florida resort town. Fastening onto a TV prime-time soap opera about teen werewolves, he pulls everyone into the show and the fanfic universe surrounding it, resulting in occasional musings about writing. Sloane replaces Aubrey as Vera's bestie, and Remy asks for Sloane's help to understand the breakup. Sloane decides to right the wrong done to Gabe and Vera when their new, young stepmother gives away a meaningful painting done by their deceased artist mother, an immigrant from the Dominican Republic. Obviously, it's not the plot that matters here, but the commentary on writing, art, friendship, love, and facing the future is always entertaining. In addition to Latino Vera and Gabe, Remy is described as dark-skinned; Sloane, Aubrey, and Frank seem to be white.

Mild in every way but language, this tale of privileged teens offers a fairly satisfying glimpse of an almost alternate universe in which mundane life can be ignored. (Fiction. 12-18)

Pub Date: Oct. 4, 2016

ISBN: 978-1-62779-935-5

Page Count: 320

Publisher: Henry Holt

Review Posted Online: July 20, 2016

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 1, 2016

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An inspirational read.

THE LIGHT IN HIDDEN PLACES

A true story of faith, love, and heroism.

Stefania “Fusia” Podgórska longed for nothing more than to leave the rural Polish farm she was born on for the city of Przemyśl where her older sisters lived. At the age of 12, she did just that, finding a job with the Diamants, a family of Jewish shopkeepers who welcomed her into their lives. For three years they lived peacefully until the Germans dropped bombs on Przemyśl. The family struggled on as the war and anti-Semitism ramped up, but eventually, the Diamants were forced into a ghetto. Then 17, Catholic Fusia was determined to help them survive, even at the risk of her own safety, while also caring for her 6-year-old sister, Helena, after their family was taken by the Nazis for forced labor. Knowing the risks involved, Fusia made a bold decision to harbor Jews. As the number of people she sheltered increased, so did her panic about being caught, but she was determined to do what was right. Cameron (The Knowing, 2017, etc.) used Stefania’s unpublished memoir as well as interviews with family members as source material. She deftly details Fusia’s brave actions and includes moving family photographs in the author’s note. Narrated in the first person, the story highlights essential events in Fusia’s life while maintaining a consistent pace. Readers will be pulled in by the compelling opening and stay for the emotional journey.

An inspirational read. (author’s note) (Historical fiction. 13-18)

Pub Date: March 3, 2020

ISBN: 978-1-338-35593-2

Page Count: 400

Publisher: Scholastic

Review Posted Online: Dec. 8, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 1, 2020

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Riveting, brutal and beautifully told.

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WE WERE LIARS

A devastating tale of greed and secrets springs from the summer that tore Cady’s life apart.

Cady Sinclair’s family uses its inherited wealth to ensure that each successive generation is blond, beautiful and powerful. Reunited each summer by the family patriarch on his private island, his three adult daughters and various grandchildren lead charmed, fairy-tale lives (an idea reinforced by the periodic inclusions of Cady’s reworkings of fairy tales to tell the Sinclair family story). But this is no sanitized, modern Disney fairy tale; this is Cinderella with her stepsisters’ slashed heels in bloody glass slippers. Cady’s fairy-tale retellings are dark, as is the personal tragedy that has led to her examination of the skeletons in the Sinclair castle’s closets; its rent turns out to be extracted in personal sacrifices. Brilliantly, Lockhart resists simply crucifying the Sinclairs, which might make the family’s foreshadowed tragedy predictable or even satisfying. Instead, she humanizes them (and their painful contradictions) by including nostalgic images that showcase the love shared among Cady, her two cousins closest in age, and Gat, the Heathcliff-esque figure she has always loved. Though increasingly disenchanted with the Sinclair legacy of self-absorption, the four believe family redemption is possible—if they have the courage to act. Their sincere hopes and foolish naïveté make the teens’ desperate, grand gesture all that much more tragic.

Riveting, brutal and beautifully told. (Fiction. 14 & up)

Pub Date: May 13, 2014

ISBN: 978-0-385-74126-2

Page Count: 240

Publisher: Delacorte

Review Posted Online: March 17, 2014

Kirkus Reviews Issue: April 1, 2014

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