An empathetic glimpse into the rise of tomorrow’s celebrity du jour.

TINFOIL CROWNS

With her quirky sense of humor and handcrafted tinfoil accessories, 17-year-old Fit is a YouTube sensation.

Fit is driven to rise above her circumstances. When she was a toddler, her family had a comfortable, middle-class life. This all changed when Fit’s mother, River, in the hellish grip of postpartum psychosis, tried to kill her and her infant brother. River went to prison, Fit’s grandfather gained custody, and the family lost everything. Fit’s trauma metastasized into a temper that quickly escalates into destructive rage when triggered. Her legions of fans and their comments, shares, and likes are her comfort. Her mother’s eventual release from prison provides just the kind of storyline her followers crave, and Fit’s manipulation of the mother-daughter drama brings the views she needs to secure her big break but leaves a slew of wounded relationships in its wake. Debut author Jones weaves together enormous themes—mental health, trauma, social media, and class—without a hint of judgment. This of-the-minute narrative is accessible and authentic, layered with diverse, flawed, and immensely likable characters. The perspective shifts between Fit and River, the latter both in the past when she lost touch with reality and in the present as she achingly works to piece herself and her family back together after more than a decade of incarceration. Fit and her family are white.

An empathetic glimpse into the rise of tomorrow’s celebrity du jour. (Fiction. 14-18)

Pub Date: May 7, 2019

ISBN: 978-1-63583-032-3

Page Count: 352

Publisher: Flux

Review Posted Online: Feb. 10, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 1, 2019

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Riveting, brutal and beautifully told.

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WE WERE LIARS

A devastating tale of greed and secrets springs from the summer that tore Cady’s life apart.

Cady Sinclair’s family uses its inherited wealth to ensure that each successive generation is blond, beautiful and powerful. Reunited each summer by the family patriarch on his private island, his three adult daughters and various grandchildren lead charmed, fairy-tale lives (an idea reinforced by the periodic inclusions of Cady’s reworkings of fairy tales to tell the Sinclair family story). But this is no sanitized, modern Disney fairy tale; this is Cinderella with her stepsisters’ slashed heels in bloody glass slippers. Cady’s fairy-tale retellings are dark, as is the personal tragedy that has led to her examination of the skeletons in the Sinclair castle’s closets; its rent turns out to be extracted in personal sacrifices. Brilliantly, Lockhart resists simply crucifying the Sinclairs, which might make the family’s foreshadowed tragedy predictable or even satisfying. Instead, she humanizes them (and their painful contradictions) by including nostalgic images that showcase the love shared among Cady, her two cousins closest in age, and Gat, the Heathcliff-esque figure she has always loved. Though increasingly disenchanted with the Sinclair legacy of self-absorption, the four believe family redemption is possible—if they have the courage to act. Their sincere hopes and foolish naïveté make the teens’ desperate, grand gesture all that much more tragic.

Riveting, brutal and beautifully told. (Fiction. 14 & up)

Pub Date: May 13, 2014

ISBN: 978-0-385-74126-2

Page Count: 240

Publisher: Delacorte

Review Posted Online: March 17, 2014

Kirkus Reviews Issue: April 1, 2014

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Grimly plainly worked hard, but, as the title indicates, the result serves his own artistic vision more than Mary Shelley’s.

GRIS GRIMLY'S FRANKENSTEIN

A slightly abridged graphic version of the classic that will drive off all but the artist’s most inveterate fans.

Admirers of the original should be warned away by veteran horror artist Bernie Wrightson’s introductory comments about Grimly’s “wonderfully sly stylization” and the “twinkle” in his artistic eye. Most general readers will founder on the ensuing floods of tiny faux handwritten script that fill the opening 10 pages of stage-setting correspondence (other lengthy letters throughout are presented in similarly hard-to-read typefaces). The few who reach Victor Frankenstein’s narrative will find it—lightly pruned and, in places, translated into sequences of largely wordless panels—in blocks of varied length interspersed amid sheaves of cramped illustrations with, overall, a sickly, greenish-yellow cast. The latter feature spidery, often skeletal figures that barrel over rough landscapes in rococo, steampunk-style vehicles when not assuming melodramatic poses. Though the rarely seen monster is a properly hard-to-resolve jumble of massive rage and lank hair, Dr. Frankenstein looks like a decayed Lyle Lovett with high cheekbones and an errant, outsized quiff. His doomed bride, Elizabeth, sports a white lock à la Elsa Lanchester, and decorative grotesqueries range from arrangements of bones and skull-faced flowers to bunnies and clownish caricatures.

Grimly plainly worked hard, but, as the title indicates, the result serves his own artistic vision more than Mary Shelley’s. (Graphic classic. 14 & up)

Pub Date: Aug. 27, 2013

ISBN: 978-0-06-186297-7

Page Count: 208

Publisher: Balzer + Bray/HarperCollins

Review Posted Online: July 3, 2013

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 15, 2013

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