FACE TO FACE WITH WHALES

This addition to National Geographic’s Face to Face with Animals series introduces whales. Opening with photographer Nicklin’s first research encounter nearly 30 years ago, the text goes on to describe physical characteristics, family lives and eating methods, and to touch on issues concerning their ocean environment and human encounters from hunting to whale-watching. Extensive photo captions add intriguing facts about specific species. The photographs are the main attraction here, beginning with the astonishingly close-up humpback face on the front cover and title page. Curiously, although the author makes the point that whale species can be identified by the shape of their flukes, captions for the two photos that show only flukes fail to indicate the species. As in other books in the series, the endmatter includes sections on How You Can Help (environmental protection and adopt-a-whale programs), It’s Your Turn (doing research) and Facts at a Glance, as well as a glossary, suggestions for further reading and web exploration, index and research and photo notes. Complements the authors’ Face to Face with Dolphins (2007). (Nonfiction. 7-10)

Pub Date: May 13, 2008

ISBN: 978-1-4263-0244-2

Page Count: 32

Publisher: National Geographic

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 2008

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet

Friends of these pollinators will be best served elsewhere.

1001 BEES

This book is buzzing with trivia.

Follow a swarm of bees as they leave a beekeeper’s apiary in search of a new home. As the scout bees traverse the fields, readers are provided with a potpourri of facts and statements about bees. The information is scattered—much like the scout bees—and as a result, both the nominal plot and informational content are tissue-thin. There are some interesting facts throughout the book, but many pieces of trivia are too, well trivial, to prove useful. For example, as the bees travel, readers learn that “onion flowers are round and fluffy” and “fennel is a plant that is used in cooking.” Other facts are oversimplified and as a result are not accurate. For example, monofloral honey is defined as “made by bees who visit just one kind of flower” with no acknowledgment of the fact that bees may range widely, and swarm activity is described as a springtime event, when it can also occur in summer and early fall. The information in the book, such as species identification and measurement units, is directed toward British readers. The flat, thin-lined artwork does little to enhance the story, but an “I spy” game challenging readers to find a specific bee throughout is amusing.

Friends of these pollinators will be best served elsewhere. (Informational picture book. 8-10)

Pub Date: May 18, 2021

ISBN: 978-0-500-65265-7

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Thames & Hudson

Review Posted Online: April 14, 2021

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 2021

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet

MR. POPPER'S PENGUINS

This is rather a silly story, and I don't believe children will think it particularly funny. A paper hanger and painter finds time on his hands in winter, and spends it in reading of arctic exploration. It is all given reality when he receives a present of a penguin, which makes its nest in the refrigerator on cubes of ice, mates with a lonely penguin from the zoo, and produces a family of penguins which help set the Poppers on their feet.

Pub Date: Sept. 26, 1938

ISBN: 978-0-316-05843-8

Page Count: 139

Publisher: Little, Brown

Review Posted Online: Jan. 15, 2014

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 1, 1938

Did you like this book?

more