THE COLLECTED WRITINGS OF FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT by Frank Lloyd Wright

THE COLLECTED WRITINGS OF FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT

Vol. IV: 1939-1949
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KIRKUS REVIEW

 As the articles, speeches, interviews, and books included here attest, the 1940s was a busy and honor-filled decade for America's most famous architect: Fallingwater and the Johnson Wax administration building were completed; the American Institute of Architects awarded him its Gold Medal; and he was commissioned to design New York's Guggenheim Museum. Wright (18671959) wrote and spoke against America's involvement in WW II at every opportunity; he also opposed the increasingly popular International Style in architecture. Connoisseurs of advanced nay-saying will enjoy his often ranting rhetoric (``in this prevailing atmosphere made by a false architecture, a phony political system, and education for some purpose or other which I have never been able to understand because it certainly is not on speaking terms with Culture'') and note that behind even the most overheated statements usually lurks the germ of a good idea. Reprints of Books Five and Six of Wright's revised Autobiography and of his fascinating tribute to Louis Sullivan, Genius and the Mobocracy, are particularly welcome. The photos and illustrations (many in color) are handsome, but they can only enhance, never compete with, the drama of Wright's words.

Pub Date: Jan. 5th, 1995
ISBN: 0-8478-1803-9
Page count: 368pp
Publisher: Rizzoli
Review Posted Online:
Kirkus Reviews Issue: Dec. 1st, 1994




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