A fast-paced time-travel tale that, ultimately, can’t escape the genre.

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RABBIT HOLE

THE PARADOX SERIES - BOOK 1

In the first volume of the time-traveling Paradox series, a team of brilliant scientists and highly trained law enforcement officers fight to keep vigilantes from destroying history.

In the near future, Dr. Nora Hamilton is the gorgeous wunderkind of the Rabbit Hole Time Travel Company, the first corporation to corner the market on recreational time travel. While studying at MIT, Nora develops a working relationship with her equally brilliant professor, Marcus Locke. Together, they build Rabbit Hole up from nothing and become fabulously wealthy in the process. It is a dream job for Nora until New Year’s Eve 2024, when a trip goes wrong. Nora soon discovers that she’s been tracked for months by an ex-Marine named Nick Canton, and he has some news for her: A group known as the Rippers are blowing through history, changing what they please to suit their own agenda. To make matters worse, they’ve kidnapped Marcus, the one man who understands the intricacies of time travel even better than Nora. Nick works for Paradox Force, an underground agency tasked with keeping time travel safe, and now they need Nora’s help to stop the Rippers. As she and Nick grow close, Rippers alter the course of civilization throughout time, and Nick and Nora can’t be sure what is “real” history and what has been altered. They’ll have to work fast in the present—and the past—in order to secure the future. The novel moves at a quick clip, with short chapters and a snappy plot that keeps the pages turning. Certain clichés abound, however. The romantic relationship between Nick and Nora is predictable, and the book doesn’t add as much as it could to pre-existing time-travel narratives, focusing instead on the nature of the so-called butterfly effect. Nevertheless, readers with a cursory knowledge of history will enjoy seeing Nick and Nora struggle to remember what is fact and what is fiction.

A fast-paced time-travel tale that, ultimately, can’t escape the genre.

Pub Date: July 10, 2013

ISBN: 978-0989662208

Page Count: 252

Publisher: GarrettSmithBooks

Review Posted Online: Aug. 9, 2013

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Stricter than, say, Bergen Evans or W3 ("disinterested" means impartial — period), Strunk is in the last analysis...

THE ELEMENTS OF STYLE

50TH ANNIVERSARY EDITION

Privately published by Strunk of Cornell in 1918 and revised by his student E. B. White in 1959, that "little book" is back again with more White updatings.

Stricter than, say, Bergen Evans or W3 ("disinterested" means impartial — period), Strunk is in the last analysis (whoops — "A bankrupt expression") a unique guide (which means "without like or equal").

Pub Date: May 15, 1972

ISBN: 0205632645

Page Count: 105

Publisher: Macmillan

Review Posted Online: Oct. 28, 2011

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 1972

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Analyzing his craft, a careful craftsman urges with Thoreauvian conviction that writers should simplify, simplify, simplify.

SEVERAL SHORT SENTENCES ABOUT WRITING

New York Times columnist and editorial board member delivers a slim book for aspiring writers, offering saws and sense, wisdom and waggery, biases and biting sarcasm.

Klinkenborg (Timothy; or, Notes of an Abject Reptile, 2006), who’s taught for decades, endeavors to keep things simple in his prose, and he urges other writers to do the same. (Note: He despises abuses of the word as, as he continually reminds readers.) In the early sections, the author ignores traditional paragraphing so that the text resembles a long free-verse poem. He urges readers to use short, clear sentences and to make sure each one is healthy before moving on; notes that it’s acceptable to start sentences with and and but; sees benefits in diagramming sentences; stresses that all writing is revision; periodically blasts the formulaic writing that many (most?) students learn in school; argues that knowing where you’re headed before you begin might be good for a vacation, but not for a piece of writing; and believes that writers must trust readers more, and trust themselves. Most of Klinkenborg’s advice is neither radical nor especially profound (“Turn to the poets. / Learn from them”), and the text suffers from a corrosive fallacy: that if his strategies work for him they will work for all. The final fifth of the text includes some passages from writers he admires (McPhee, Oates, Cheever) and some of his students’ awkward sentences, which he treats analytically but sometimes with a surprising sarcasm that veers near meanness. He includes examples of students’ dangling modifiers, malapropisms, errors of pronoun agreement, wordiness and other mistakes.

Analyzing his craft, a careful craftsman urges with Thoreauvian conviction that writers should simplify, simplify, simplify.

Pub Date: Aug. 7, 2012

ISBN: 978-0-307-26634-7

Page Count: 224

Publisher: Knopf

Review Posted Online: May 14, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 15, 2012

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