BUSY IN THE GARDEN

Shannon and Williams produce a joyful celebration of gardening, vegetables and silliness. Each page or spread features one poem about planting, harvesting or eating the crop. Some are direct: “To grow the size / that wins a prize, / it’s always wise / to fertilize.” Some are playful and silly: “Zucchini” begins with “Zucchini / meeny / miney / moe” and progresses through so many zucchini delicacies that it ends with “Zucchini / meeny / miney / MOAN.” Consider this riddle: “Mama planted summer hats. / Papa planted thread. / Sister planted ink stamps. / Brother planted bread.” The answer, printed upside down, is “straw, cotton, potato, wheat.” The rhythms scan satisfyingly. Cheerful, airy pictures in watercolor and black line show vegetables of all sizes (sometimes growing or harvested, sometimes dancing!) and small children reminiscent of A Hole Is to Dig. Get ready to reap some new young gardeners who will relish their veggies. (Picture book. 2-5)

Pub Date: March 1, 2006

ISBN: 0-06-000464-9

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Greenwillow Books

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 1, 2006

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A satisfying friendship story to share with very young children in the days leading up to Halloween.

TEENY TINY GHOST

This board book twists the traditional “Teeny Tiny” tale into a less-scary Halloween treat.

This version uses a singsong-y rhythm and cadence to tell the story. “In the teeny tiny barn / Of a teeny tiny house... / Lived a teeny tiny ghost / and a teeny tiny mouse.” Of course the ghost (being teeny tiny) is not very frightening. “But the determined little ghost / Let her mighty courage through / And with a teeny tiny breath / She said a teeny tiny: boo.” Spoiler alert: After just seven page turns the ghost and mouse become friends: “And now the teeny tinies play / In the teeny tiny house. / Just a teeny tiny ghost / And her best friend, mouse.” Pumpkins decorate the cover and final spread and illustrations throughout are in autumnal hues. The fairly high-for-the-format word count—19 to 21 words per page—may be more than toddlers will sit still for, but the “teeny tiny” repetition and rhymes will help. The size (just 6 inches square) makes using the book with a group a challenge, but with a lap-sitting child, it’ll be a pleasure.

A satisfying friendship story to share with very young children in the days leading up to Halloween. (Board book. 2-4)

Pub Date: July 30, 2019

ISBN: 978-1-338-31848-7

Page Count: 16

Publisher: Cartwheel/Scholastic

Review Posted Online: April 28, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 15, 2019

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EVERYONE POOPS

This straightforward, graphic book was published in Japan in 1978. Whether the US is ready for its unblinking look at a subject that naturally fascinates children and is basic to toilet training remains to be seen. ``An elephant makes a big poop. A mouse makes a tiny poop,'' begins Gomi, depicting animals, birds, fish, and humans in boldly stylized forms silhouetted against origami-paper colors; their feces are appropriately shaped blobs. There's a lot to know: different shapes, colors, and smells (not described), while some animals stop but ``Others do it on the move.'' A child heading for ``a special place'' introduces a nonjudgmental comparison of adults and tots on toilets and potties with a baby on a diaper. The book concludes with a seven- animal lineup viewed fore (``All living things eat, so...'') and aft (``Everyone poops''). Candid and sensible. (Picture book. 2- 5)

Pub Date: March 1, 1993

ISBN: 0-916291-45-6

Page Count: 26

Publisher: Kane Miller

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Feb. 15, 1993

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