A clear and winning guide to a key social grace; share and repeat as necessary. (Board book. 1-4)

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WILL BEAR SHARE?

Sharing can be fun, although it may have its limits.

Author/illustrator Leung poses a social and ethical dilemma in this book and a practical problem in the equally charming companion volume, Will Sheep Sleep? Bear has lots to offer, but will she? Consecutive double-page spreads offer a series of questions and answers: “Will Bear share her berries?” / “Yes.” / “Will Bear share her book?” / “Yes.” / “Will Bear share her toothbrush?” / “NO! Toothbrushes are not for sharing.” Bear and her adorable animal pals act out each vignette against lightly textured backgrounds of several different hues. The presentation is uncluttered and pleasing to the eye, and the simply rendered characters have abundant personality. The drama heats up when Bear is asked to share her favorite toy (after due deliberation, she does) and, finally, her ice cream. This, apparently, is where Bear draws her line in the sand, but when her coneful of ice cream lands on the ground, her hungry crocodile friend kindly consoles her. Fortunately, Ladybug comes to the rescue with a large berry cake to be shared by all. As Ladybug, Bear, and friends enjoy the cake, readers are asked, “What do you share?” The final panel, appropriately enough, shows Bear and her alligator friend brushing their teeth together, each with their own toothbrush, of course.

A clear and winning guide to a key social grace; share and repeat as necessary. (Board book. 1-4)

Pub Date: May 29, 2018

ISBN: 978-1-338-21559-5

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Cartwheel/Scholastic

Review Posted Online: June 11, 2018

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 1, 2018

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Wonderful, indeed

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THE WONDERFUL THINGS YOU WILL BE

A GROWING-UP POEM

A love song to baby with delightful illustrations to boot.

Sweet but not saccharine and singsong but not forced, Martin’s text is one that will invite rereadings as it affirms parental wishes for children while admirably keeping child readers at its heart. The lines that read “This is the first time / There’s ever been you, / So I wonder what wonderful things / You will do” capture the essence of the picture book and are accompanied by a diverse group of babies and toddlers clad in downright adorable outfits. Other spreads include older kids, too, and pictures expand on the open text to visually interpret the myriad possibilities and hopes for the depicted children. For example, a spread reading “Will you learn how to fly / To find the best view?” shows a bespectacled, school-aged girl on a swing soaring through an empty white background. This is just one spread in which Martin’s fearless embrace of the white of the page serves her well. Throughout the book, she maintains a keen balance of layout choices, and surprising details—zebras on the wallpaper behind a father cradling his child, a rock-’n’-roll band of mice paralleling the children’s own band called “The Missing Teeth”—add visual interest and gentle humor. An ideal title for the baby-shower gift bag and for any nursery bookshelf or lap-sit storytime.

Wonderful, indeed . (Picture book. 1-4)

Pub Date: Aug. 25, 2015

ISBN: 978-0-385-37671-6

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Random House

Review Posted Online: June 6, 2015

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 15, 2015

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A happily multisensory exploration.

NOISY FARM

From the My First Touch and Feel Sound Book series

Farm animals make realistic noises as youngsters press embedded tactile features.

“Pat the cow’s back to hear her ‘Moo!’ ” Readers can press the fuzzy, black circle on a Holstein cow to hear its recorded noise. This formula is repeated on each double-page spread, one per farm critter (roosters, piglets, lambs and horses). Using stock photography, several smaller images of the animals appear on the left, and a full-page close-up dominates the right. The final two pages are a review of the five farmyard creatures and include a photo of each as well as a review of their sounds in succession via a touch of a button. While the layout is a little busy, the selection of photos and the tactile elements are nicely diverse. The text is simple enough for little ones, encourages interaction (“Can you baa like a lamb?”) and uses animal-specific vocabulary (fleece; mane). The sister title, Noisy Trucks (978-1-58925-609-5), follows much the same format, but, here, the stars are big rigs, monster trucks, fire trucks, backhoes and cement mixers. While the photos will thrill the vehicle-obsessed, the noises are less distinctive, save the fire truck’s siren. The facts about each type of vehicle provide just enough information: “A fire truck has a loud siren, ladders to climb, and hoses that spray water.” Despite the age recommendation of 3 years and up suggested on the back cover, the construction (with the battery secured by screw behind a plastic panel) looks sturdy and safe enough for younger readers.

A happily multisensory exploration. (Board book. 18 mos.-3)

Pub Date: Sept. 1, 2013

ISBN: 978-1-58925-610-1

Page Count: 12

Publisher: Tiger Tales

Review Posted Online: Sept. 14, 2013

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 1, 2014

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