THE LION'S CUB by H.M. Hoover

THE LION'S CUB

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Jemal-Edin, the first son of the ruler of Daghestan and almost a man by the standard of his people's harsh, Muslim-Caucasian culture, is given as a hostage to Czar Nicholas I, where he becomes a child prince of the Russian aristocracy. The Lion's Cub thus is little more than a vehicle for a comparison between the two nations, and apparently we are expected, like him, to opt for the civilization of 19th century czarism. Certainly the inequality, poverty, and cruelty of his own people is shocking (at one point the bodies of dead children are used as weapons against the attacking army), but the proud youth's accommodation to coddling nannies and luxurious palaces is somehow sad -- and a dull story, besides. The fate of the real Jemal-Edin, who returned to his own people only to be rejected as an outcast and enemy and killed by his own father, is told in an afterword, but though the settings are rich and evocative, Hoover has captured only the shadow of this tragic prince.
Pub Date: Oct. 21st, 1974
ISBN: 0590073753
Page count: 211pp
Publisher: Four Winds/MacMillan
Review Posted Online:
Kirkus Reviews Issue: Oct. 1st, 1974




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