DOCTOR, WHAT SHOULD I EAT? by Isadore Rosenfeld

DOCTOR, WHAT SHOULD I EAT?

Nutrition Prescriptions for Ailments in Which Diet Can Really Make a Difference
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KIRKUS REVIEW

 Writer Jane Stern, that tireless observer of American fads and fancies, recently noted that today's puritan eating obsessions represent a new culinary idea: Food is medicine. For popular medical guide Dr. Rosenberg (Second Opinion, 1980, etc.) this is literally the case: ``Almost every major medical condition you can think of is either caused or affected in some way by what you eat.'' Rosenberg is no Dr. Kellogg--he's not a depriving dietary zealot; nor is he offering a magic mega-nutrient cure-all. We may be talking minimizing intake of aluminum, on the outside chance that it's related to Alzheimer's; we're talking omega-3 fish-oil supplements for migraines. But we're also talking balanced diet, fresh fruits and vegetables, and the well-known reports that a low- fat, high-fiber diet prevents a variety of cancers. Rosenberg reviews all the findings about food and specific bodily breakdowns in alphabetical order from acne (no, chocolate doesn't aggravate it) to vaginal yeast infection (yes, yogurt does work--but not the frozen kind). (First printing of 250,000)

Pub Date: Jan. 1st, 1995
ISBN: 0-679-42818-6
Page count: 416pp
Publisher: Random House
Review Posted Online:
Kirkus Reviews Issue: Nov. 15th, 1994




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