A useful and engaging overview of the science of mind and behavior.

PSYCHOLOGY FOR KIDS

THE SCIENCE OF THE MIND AND BEHAVIOR

This kid-friendly introduction to psychology describes what the science is, what psychologists do, and how they do it.

Chapter by chapter, the authors, who are clinical psychologists, cover a broad range of topics including the brain, cognition, gender and identity, learning and growing, personality, intelligence, emotions, managing stress, and relationships. In short, readable, colorfully illustrated segments adorned with ample text boxes, they explain concepts and issues, offer examples of research, and suggest ways readers can do their own investigations. Important vocabulary is bolded and explained in context. Some of these words and phrases will probably be familiar, such as autism spectrum, eating disorders, and ADHD. Others are more technical, and still others emerge from the history of the field, such as bystander effect, cognitive dissonance, operant conditioning, and multiple intelligences. The writers deftly connect their subject with their audience, posing questions, inviting action, and regularly summarizing important points. Unusually, they conclude with a chapter about environmental issues and how psychologists work to “encourage behaviors that help to preserve the natural world.” Cheerful digital illustrations include people of various ages representing a racial and ethnic variety. Unfortunately, laudable attempts to address racial bias and its impact are undermined by sentences that reinforce stereotypes, such as “Some kids of color or kids from less affluent communities might be smarter than IQ tests can show.”

A useful and engaging overview of the science of mind and behavior. (glossary, index) (Nonfiction. 10-14)

Pub Date: Aug. 3, 2021

ISBN: 978-1-4338-3210-9

Page Count: 256

Publisher: Magination/American Psychological Association

Review Posted Online: June 11, 2021

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 1, 2021

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A likable journey that is sensitive to the triumphs and agonies of being a 13-year-old girl.

FRIENDS FOREVER

From the Friends series , Vol. 3

Shannon just wants to get through eighth grade in one piece—while feeling like her own worst enemy.

In this third entry in popular author for young people Hale’s graphic memoir series, the young, sensitive overachiever is crushed by expectations: to be cool but loyal to her tightknit and dramatic friend group, a top student but not a nerd, attractive to boys but true to her ideals. As events in Shannon’s life begin to overwhelm her, she works toward finding a way to love and understand herself, follow her passions for theater and writing, and ignore her cruel inner voice. Capturing the visceral embarrassments of middle school in 1987 Salt Lake City, Shannon’s emotions are vivid and often excruciating. In particular, the social norms of a church-oriented family are clearly addressed, and religion is shown as being both a comfort and a struggle for Shannon. While the text is sometimes in danger of spelling things out a little too neatly and obviously, the emotional honesty and sincerity drawn from Hale’s own life win out. Pham’s artwork is vibrant and appealing, with stylistic changes for Shannon’s imaginings and the leeching out of color and use of creative panel structures as her anxiety and depression worsen.

A likable journey that is sensitive to the triumphs and agonies of being a 13-year-old girl. (author's note, gallery) (Graphic memoir. 10-14)

Pub Date: Aug. 31, 2021

ISBN: 978-1-250-31755-1

Page Count: 320

Publisher: First Second

Review Posted Online: June 11, 2021

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 1, 2021

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A powerful resource for young people itching for change.

WOLFPACK (YOUNG READERS EDITION)

HOW YOUNG PEOPLE WILL FIND THEIR VOICE, UNITE THEIR PACK, AND CHANGE THE WORLD

Soccer star and activist Wambach adapts Wolfpack (2019), her New York Times bestseller for adults, for a middle-grade audience.

YOU. ARE. THE. WOLVES.” That rallying cry, each word proudly occupying its own line on the page, neatly sums up the fierce determination Wambach demands of her audience. The original Wolfpack was an adaptation of the viral 2018 commencement speech she gave at Barnard College; in her own words, it was “a directive to unleash [the graduates’] individuality, unite the collective, and change the world.” This new adaption takes the themes of the original and recasts them in kid-friendly terms, the call to action feeling more relevant now than ever. With the exception of the introduction and closing remarks, each short chapter presents a new leadership philosophy, dishing out such timeless advice as “Be grateful and ambitious”; “Make failure your fuel”; “Champion each other”; and “Find your pack.” Chapters utilize “rules” as a framing device. The first page of each presents a generalized “old” and “new” rule pertaining to that chapter’s guiding principle, and each chapter closes with a “Call to the Wolfpack” that sums up those principles in more specific terms. Some parts of the book come across as somewhat quixotic or buzzword-heavy, but Wambach deftly mitigates much of the preachiness with a bluff, congenial tone and refreshing dashes of self-deprecating humor. Personal anecdotes help ground each of the philosophies in applicability, and myriad heavy issues are respectfully, yet simply broached.

A powerful resource for young people itching for change. (Nonfiction. 10-14)

Pub Date: Oct. 6, 2020

ISBN: 978-1-250-76686-1

Page Count: 112

Publisher: Roaring Brook Press

Review Posted Online: Sept. 1, 2020

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 15, 2020

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