Fun and games, with something deeper to think about.

TAG YOUR DREAMS

POEMS OF PLAY AND PERSISTENCE

Get moving in whatever activity brings satisfaction and joy.

Jules presents a plethora of possibilities as the theme of children at play provides the structure for a collection of poems that encourage and applaud. Most of the verses are narrated in the first person, describing feelings of hope, patience, determination, frustration, pride, or glorious victory in games played singly, in pairs, or on teams. A batter ignores previous failures and concentrates on the next pitch while a fielder is so in the moment watching a ball that the outfield fence looms behind with the danger of a crash. A new friendship is formed with a clapping game, and a pair of tennis players waits endlessly for court time. Family relationships are forged and changed while engaging in hiking or miniature golf or riding scooters. Feelings of disappointment and hurt are overcome, and goals are set or achieved. Jules does not employ rhymes or obvious rhythm, but each poem flows easily as a brief vignette that captures just the right sentiment and spirit. The poems never indicate the gender or ethnicity of their narrators; that is left to Deppe’s bright, appealing illustrations. Here readers see nonstereotypical depictions of girls and boys of many different racial presentations. One of the children playing the clapping game is in a wheelchair.

Fun and games, with something deeper to think about. (Picture book/poetry. 6-10)

Pub Date: April 1, 2020

ISBN: 978-0-8075-6726-5

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Whitman

Review Posted Online: Jan. 21, 2020

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 1, 2020

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Here’s hoping this will inspire many children to joyfully engage in writing.

WRITE! WRITE! WRITE!

Both technique and imaginative impulse can be found in this useful selection of poems about the literary art.

Starting with the essentials of the English language, the letters of “Our Alphabet,” the collection moves through 21 other poems of different types, meters, and rhyme schemes. This anthology has clear classroom applications, but it will also be enjoyed by individual readers who can pore carefully over playful illustrations filled with diverse children, butterflies, flowers, books, and pieces of writing. Tackling various parts of the writing process, from “How To Begin” through “Revision Is” to “Final Edit,” the poems also touch on some reasons for writing, like “Thank You Notes” and “Writing About Reading.” Some of the poems are funny, as in the quirky, four-line “If I Were an Octopus”: “I’d grab eight pencils. / All identical. / I’d fill eight notebooks. / One per tentacle.” An amusing undersea scene dominated by a smiling, orangy octopus fills this double-page spread. Some of the poems are more focused (and less lyrical) than others, such as “Final Edit” with its ending stanzas: “I check once more to guarantee / all is flawless as can be. / Careless errors will discredit / my hard work. / That’s why I edit. / But I don’t like it. / There I said it.” At least the poet tries for a little humor in those final lines.

Here’s hoping this will inspire many children to joyfully engage in writing. (Picture book/poetry. 7-10)

Pub Date: March 17, 2020

ISBN: 978-1-68437-362-8

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Wordsong/Boyds Mills

Review Posted Online: Dec. 18, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 1, 2020

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Blandly laudatory.

I AM WALT DISNEY

From the Ordinary People Change the World series

The iconic animator introduces young readers to each “happy place” in his life.

The tally begins with his childhood home in Marceline, Missouri, and climaxes with Disneyland (carefully designed to be “the happiest place on Earth”), but the account really centers on finding his true happy place, not on a map but in drawing. In sketching out his early flubs and later rocket to the top, the fictive narrator gives Ub Iwerks and other Disney studio workers a nod (leaving his labor disputes with them unmentioned) and squeezes in quick references to his animated films, from Steamboat Willie to Winnie the Pooh (sans Fantasia and Song of the South). Eliopoulos incorporates stills from the films into his cartoon illustrations and, characteristically for this series, depicts Disney as a caricature, trademark mustache in place on outsized head even in childhood years and child sized even as an adult. Human figures default to white, with occasional people of color in crowd scenes and (ahistorically) in the animation studio. One unidentified animator builds up the role-modeling with an observation that Walt and Mickey were really the same (“Both fearless; both resourceful”). An assertion toward the end—“So when do you stop being a child? When you stop dreaming”—muddles the overall follow-your-bliss message. A timeline to the EPCOT Center’s 1982 opening offers photos of the man with select associates, rodent and otherwise. An additional series entry, I Am Marie Curie, publishes simultaneously, featuring a gowned, toddler-sized version of the groundbreaking physicist accepting her two Nobel prizes.

Blandly laudatory. (bibliography) (Picture book/biography. 6-8)

Pub Date: Sept. 10, 2019

ISBN: 978-0-7352-2875-7

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Dial Books

Review Posted Online: Aug. 18, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 1, 2019

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