Fun and games, with something deeper to think about.

READ REVIEW

TAG YOUR DREAMS

POEMS OF PLAY AND PERSISTENCE

Get moving in whatever activity brings satisfaction and joy.

Jules presents a plethora of possibilities as the theme of children at play provides the structure for a collection of poems that encourage and applaud. Most of the verses are narrated in the first person, describing feelings of hope, patience, determination, frustration, pride, or glorious victory in games played singly, in pairs, or on teams. A batter ignores previous failures and concentrates on the next pitch while a fielder is so in the moment watching a ball that the outfield fence looms behind with the danger of a crash. A new friendship is formed with a clapping game, and a pair of tennis players waits endlessly for court time. Family relationships are forged and changed while engaging in hiking or miniature golf or riding scooters. Feelings of disappointment and hurt are overcome, and goals are set or achieved. Jules does not employ rhymes or obvious rhythm, but each poem flows easily as a brief vignette that captures just the right sentiment and spirit. The poems never indicate the gender or ethnicity of their narrators; that is left to Deppe’s bright, appealing illustrations. Here readers see nonstereotypical depictions of girls and boys of many different racial presentations. One of the children playing the clapping game is in a wheelchair.

Fun and games, with something deeper to think about. (Picture book/poetry. 6-10)

Pub Date: April 1, 2020

ISBN: 978-0-8075-6726-5

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Whitman

Review Posted Online: Jan. 21, 2020

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 1, 2020

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Blandly laudatory.

I AM WALT DISNEY

From the Ordinary People Change the World series

The iconic animator introduces young readers to each “happy place” in his life.

The tally begins with his childhood home in Marceline, Missouri, and climaxes with Disneyland (carefully designed to be “the happiest place on Earth”), but the account really centers on finding his true happy place, not on a map but in drawing. In sketching out his early flubs and later rocket to the top, the fictive narrator gives Ub Iwerks and other Disney studio workers a nod (leaving his labor disputes with them unmentioned) and squeezes in quick references to his animated films, from Steamboat Willie to Winnie the Pooh (sans Fantasia and Song of the South). Eliopoulos incorporates stills from the films into his cartoon illustrations and, characteristically for this series, depicts Disney as a caricature, trademark mustache in place on outsized head even in childhood years and child sized even as an adult. Human figures default to white, with occasional people of color in crowd scenes and (ahistorically) in the animation studio. One unidentified animator builds up the role-modeling with an observation that Walt and Mickey were really the same (“Both fearless; both resourceful”). An assertion toward the end—“So when do you stop being a child? When you stop dreaming”—muddles the overall follow-your-bliss message. A timeline to the EPCOT Center’s 1982 opening offers photos of the man with select associates, rodent and otherwise. An additional series entry, I Am Marie Curie, publishes simultaneously, featuring a gowned, toddler-sized version of the groundbreaking physicist accepting her two Nobel prizes.

Blandly laudatory. (bibliography) (Picture book/biography. 6-8)

Pub Date: Sept. 10, 2019

ISBN: 978-0-7352-2875-7

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Dial

Review Posted Online: Aug. 18, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 1, 2019

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What makes one person step into danger to help others? A question worthy of discussion, with this title as an admirable...

THE BRAVE CYCLIST

THE TRUE STORY OF A HOLOCAUST HERO

An extraordinary athlete was also an extraordinary hero.

Gino Bartali grew up in Florence, Italy, loving everything about riding bicycles. After years of studying them and years of endurance training, he won the 1938 Tour de France. His triumph was muted by the outbreak of World War II, during which Mussolini followed Hitler in the establishment of anti-Jewish laws. In the middle years of the conflict, Bartali was enlisted by a cardinal of the Italian church to help Jews by becoming a document courier. His skill as a cyclist and his fame helped him elude capture until 1944. When the war ended, he kept his clandestine efforts private and went on to win another Tour de France in 1948. The author’s afterword explains why his work was unknown. Yad Vashem, the Israeli Holocaust museum, honored him as a Righteous Among the Nations in 2013. Bartali’s is a life well worth knowing and well worthy of esteem. Fedele’s illustrations in mostly dark hues will appeal to sports fans with their action-oriented scenes. Young readers of World War II stories will gain an understanding from the somber wartime pages.

What makes one person step into danger to help others? A question worthy of discussion, with this title as an admirable springboard. (photograph, select bibliography, source notes) (Picture book/biography. 7-10)

Pub Date: Aug. 1, 2019

ISBN: 978-1-68446-063-2

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Capstone Editions

Review Posted Online: April 28, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 15, 2019

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