BRONWEN, THE TRAW, AND THE SHAPE-SHIFTER by James Dickey

BRONWEN, THE TRAW, AND THE SHAPE-SHIFTER

A POEM IN FOUR PARTS

KIRKUS REVIEW

This epic poem is an outgrowth of the stories a famous poet told his little daughter; it is a very personal book; Dickey's adult readers will share his enjoyment in "mythologizing" his own child. Young Bronwen must fight the evil of the one-footed terror, the All. Dark, which wants to take over and allow the things of the night a free rein. The King of the Squirrels asks her to defend them with the three-pronged gardening "traw" her father made for her. After Bronwen has faced the four forms of the All-Dark in combat, she comes back to her own home, family and garden. The poem is a little awkward to read aloud; the meter is complex and the language uneven, sometimes plain and childlike, sometimes stretched into overwrought images. This poetic fantasy is attractively presented as a picture book. Watson has caught the dark romantic tone of the poem in carefully detailed, imaginative black-and-white spreads. The dark tone is reminiscent of Sendak's Outside Over There but this is longer and more complex, with more adult than child appeal.
Pub Date: Sept. 1st, 1986
ISBN: 0152125809
Publisher: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich
Review Posted Online:
Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 15th, 1986




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