A rousing, funny, feminist workplace romp that also takes a frank look at modern poverty.

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THE LIFE AND (MEDIEVAL) TIMES OF KIT SWEETLY

A girl fights to modernize her medieval workplace in this energetic debut.

Seventeen-year-old Serving Wench Kit Sweetly wants to fight like her older brother, Chris, the Red Knight. After all, it’s the 21st century, and the Castle might be a medieval-themed restaurant chain, but corporate policy limits knighthood to males. History nerd Kit rejects the myths (embraced by historically uninformed white supremacists) that medieval European societies were all-white and patriarchal and soon recruits others to her cause. Secretly, she’s fighting not just for equality, but also for her future: Kit needs more money. Kit, Chris, and their mother are working poor, facing daily problems like power cuts, missed bills, mystery meals, and, now, imperiled college dreams. Pacton offers some historical tidbits but revels in pop-culture medieval fantasy references, invoking Joan of Arc alongside fictional characters from The Lord of the Rings, Game of Thrones, and even the cheese-tastic, knowingly anachronistic A Knight’s Tale. Kit is white, and her fellow workers are diverse in race, gender, and orientation—best friend Layla is black, and emphatically not-boyfriend (because they don’t want to risk ruining their friendship) Jett is half Indian/half Russian and all suave, while Kit’s recruits are Chinese American, nonbinary, and trans.

A rousing, funny, feminist workplace romp that also takes a frank look at modern poverty. (Humor. 14-18)

Pub Date: May 5, 2020

ISBN: 978-1-62414-952-8

Page Count: 384

Publisher: Page Street

Review Posted Online: Jan. 23, 2020

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Feb. 15, 2020

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An emotionally engaging closer that fumbles in its final moments.

ALWAYS AND FOREVER, LARA JEAN

From the To All the Boys I've Loved Before series , Vol. 3

Lara Jean prepares for college and a wedding.

Korean-American Lara Jean is finally settled into a nice, complication-free relationship with her white boyfriend, Peter. But things don’t stay simple for long. When college acceptance letters roll in, Peter and Lara Jean discover they’re heading in different directions. As the two discuss the long-distance thing, Lara Jean’s widower father is making a major commitment: marrying the neighbor lady he’s been dating. The whirlwind of a wedding, college visits, prom, and the last few months of senior year provides an excellent backdrop for this final book about Lara Jean. The characters ping from event to event with emotions always at the forefront. Han further develops her cast, pushing them to new maturity and leaving few stones unturned. There’s only one problem here, and it’s what’s always held this series back from true greatness: Peter. Despite Han’s best efforts to flesh out Peter with abandonment issues and a crummy dad, he remains little more than a handsome jock. Frankly, Lara Jean and Peter may have cute teen chemistry, but Han's nuanced characterizations have often helped to subvert typical teen love-story tropes. This knowing subversion is frustratingly absent from the novel's denouement.

An emotionally engaging closer that fumbles in its final moments. (Romance. 14-17)

Pub Date: May 2, 2017

ISBN: 978-1-4814-3048-7

Page Count: 336

Publisher: Simon & Schuster

Review Posted Online: March 29, 2017

Kirkus Reviews Issue: April 15, 2017

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A carefully researched, precisely written tour de force; unforgettable and wrenching.

CODE NAME VERITY

Breaking away from Arthurian legends (The Winter Prince, 1993, etc.), Wein delivers a heartbreaking tale of friendship during World War II.

In a cell in Nazi-occupied France, a young woman writes. Like Scheherezade, to whom she is compared by the SS officer in charge of her case, she dribbles out information—“everything I can remember about the British War Effort”—in exchange for time and a reprieve from torture. But her story is more than a listing of wireless codes or aircraft types. Instead, she describes her friendship with Maddie, the pilot who flew them to France, as well as the real details of the British War Effort: the breaking down of class barriers, the opportunities, the fears and victories not only of war, but of daily life. She also describes, almost casually, her unbearable current situation and the SS officer who holds her life in his hands and his beleaguered female associate, who translates the narrative each day. Through the layers of story, characters (including the Nazis) spring to life. And as the epigraph makes clear, there is more to this tale than is immediately apparent. The twists will lead readers to finish the last page and turn back to the beginning to see how the pieces slot perfectly, unexpectedly into place.

A carefully researched, precisely written tour de force; unforgettable and wrenching. (Historical fiction. 14 & up)

Pub Date: May 15, 2012

ISBN: 978-1-4231-5219-4

Page Count: 352

Publisher: Hyperion

Review Posted Online: Feb. 15, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 1, 2012

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