I AM A KINDNESS HERO

From the I Am a Warrior Goddess series

Sincere but overreaches a bit.

A young child embodies the many facets of kindness in this affirming read.

A repetitive mantra of “I am” introduces text that demonstrates how the main character engages in acts of kindness that benefit those around them: “I am a kindness hero. / I am a defender of animals…. / I am helpful. / I am patient.” These broad and sometimes-ambiguous proclamations are accompanied by illustrations that provide context and present audience-friendly scenes of generosity toward the Earth, animals, and other humans. The child’s community-focused efforts include protecting insects by building them a nesting box, helping an elder cross the street, and confronting a bully on behalf of a smaller child. Turning inward, the main character acknowledges overcoming jealousy and listening sympathetically as internal processes that respond to others with compassion. These accessible examples reassure readers that kindness empowers the enactor through actions both large and small. While these behaviors may lead to positive outcomes, the text inflates the effect of kindness, concluding that “all the people who I meet…will know they are loved.” A soothing color palette grounded in muted greens reinforces the gentle, uplifting tone of the book. The main character has black hair, brown skin, and blue eyes. Secondary characters are represented in a variety of skin tones.

Sincere but overreaches a bit. (Picture book. 3-7)

Pub Date: Jan. 26, 2021

ISBN: 978-1-68364-472-9

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Sounds True

Review Posted Online: Nov. 17, 2020

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Dec. 1, 2020

HOW TO CATCH THE EASTER BUNNY

From the How To Catch… series

This bunny escapes all the traps but fails to find a logical plot or an emotional connection with readers.

The bestselling series (How to Catch an Elf, 2016, etc.) about capturing mythical creatures continues with a story about various ways to catch the Easter Bunny as it makes its annual deliveries.

The bunny narrates its own story in rhyming text, beginning with an introduction at its office in a manufacturing facility that creates Easter eggs and candy. The rabbit then abruptly takes off on its delivery route with a tiny basket of eggs strapped to its back, immediately encountering a trap with carrots and a box propped up with a stick. The narrative focuses on how the Easter Bunny avoids increasingly complex traps set up to catch him with no explanation as to who has set the traps or why. These traps include an underground tunnel, a fluorescent dance floor with a hidden pit of carrots, a robot bunny, pirates on an island, and a cannon that shoots candy fish, as well as some sort of locked, hazardous site with radiation danger. Readers of previous books in the series will understand the premise, but others will be confused by the rabbit’s frenetic escapades. Cartoon-style illustrations have a 1960s vibe, with a slightly scary, bow-tied bunny with chartreuse eyes and a glowing palette of neon shades that shout for attention.

This bunny escapes all the traps but fails to find a logical plot or an emotional connection with readers. (Picture book. 4-7)

Pub Date: Feb. 1, 2017

ISBN: 978-1-4926-3817-9

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Sourcebooks Jabberwocky

Review Posted Online: Jan. 16, 2017

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Feb. 1, 2017

ON THE FIRST DAY OF KINDERGARTEN

While this is a fairly bland treatment compared to Deborah Lee Rose and Carey Armstrong-Ellis’ The Twelve Days of...

Rabe follows a young girl through her first 12 days of kindergarten in this book based on the familiar Christmas carol.

The typical firsts of school are here: riding the bus, making friends, sliding on the playground slide, counting, sorting shapes, laughing at lunch, painting, singing, reading, running, jumping rope, and going on a field trip. While the days are given ordinal numbers, the song skips the cardinal numbers in the verses, and the rhythm is sometimes off: “On the second day of kindergarten / I thought it was so cool / making lots of friends / and riding the bus to my school!” The narrator is a white brunette who wears either a tunic or a dress each day, making her pretty easy to differentiate from her classmates, a nice mix in terms of race; two students even sport glasses. The children in the ink, paint, and collage digital spreads show a variety of emotions, but most are happy to be at school, and the surroundings will be familiar to those who have made an orientation visit to their own schools.

While this is a fairly bland treatment compared to Deborah Lee Rose and Carey Armstrong-Ellis’ The Twelve Days of Kindergarten (2003), it basically gets the job done. (Picture book. 4-7)

Pub Date: June 21, 2016

ISBN: 978-0-06-234834-0

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Harper/HarperCollins

Review Posted Online: May 3, 2016

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 1, 2016

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