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LITTLE LAMB IN AMSTERDAM

Worth its weight in florins, guilders or even Euros.

This launch of the Wilsons’ Tiny Tourists app series is an excellent first step to the world.

Here is a little slice of the Netherlands, with enough to give a taste of what more lies ahead of any traveler who cares to make the trip, presented in either English or Dutch. There is a page of history that touches on the ruling family and Dutch colonialism and little “fun facts” in a pop-up strip at the bottom—about canals, tulips, windmills and so on. These do not intrude uninvited upon the storyline of Little Lamb’s bike ride from her van Gogh–esque farm to Amsterdam. The interaction with the application is kept to a minimum; what’s there is sweet and unpredictable (touch a cloud, and it may scud; touch another cloud, and it may vaporize). The artwork of the 25 panels has sophisticated, childlike line and color that avoid busyness. The emphasis is on the windmills, tulips, wooden shoes, Dutch tiles (used as a jigsaw puzzle), houseboats and an atmospheric canal at night fronted by old gabled houses. And Little Lamb’s bicycle squeaks most adorably.

Worth its weight in florins, guilders or even Euros. (iPad storybook app. 3-7)

Pub Date: May 14, 2014

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Joshua Wilson

Review Posted Online: June 28, 2014

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 1, 2014

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CARPENTER'S HELPER

Renata’s wren encounter proves magical, one most children could only wish to experience outside of this lovely story.

A home-renovation project is interrupted by a family of wrens, allowing a young girl an up-close glimpse of nature.

Renata and her father enjoy working on upgrading their bathroom, installing a clawfoot bathtub, and cutting a space for a new window. One warm night, after Papi leaves the window space open, two wrens begin making a nest in the bathroom. Rather than seeing it as an unfortunate delay of their project, Renata and Papi decide to let the avian carpenters continue their work. Renata witnesses the birth of four chicks as their rosy eggs split open “like coats that are suddenly too small.” Renata finds at a crucial moment that she can help the chicks learn to fly, even with the bittersweet knowledge that it will only hasten their exits from her life. Rosen uses lively language and well-chosen details to move the story of the baby birds forward. The text suggests the strong bond built by this Afro-Latinx father and daughter with their ongoing project without needing to point it out explicitly, a light touch in a picture book full of delicate, well-drawn moments and precise wording. Garoche’s drawings are impressively detailed, from the nest’s many small bits to the developing first feathers on the chicks and the wall smudges and exposed wiring of the renovation. (This book was reviewed digitally with 10-by-20-inch double-page spreads viewed at actual size.)

Renata’s wren encounter proves magical, one most children could only wish to experience outside of this lovely story. (Picture book. 3-7)

Pub Date: March 16, 2021

ISBN: 978-0-593-12320-1

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Schwartz & Wade/Random

Review Posted Online: Jan. 12, 2021

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Feb. 1, 2021

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BECAUSE I HAD A TEACHER

A sweet, soft conversation starter and a charming gift.

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A paean to teachers and their surrogates everywhere.

This gentle ode to a teacher’s skill at inspiring, encouraging, and being a role model is spoken, presumably, from a child’s viewpoint. However, the voice could equally be that of an adult, because who can’t look back upon teachers or other early mentors who gave of themselves and offered their pupils so much? Indeed, some of the self-aware, self-assured expressions herein seem perhaps more realistic as uttered from one who’s already grown. Alternatively, readers won’t fail to note that this small book, illustrated with gentle soy-ink drawings and featuring an adult-child bear duo engaged in various sedentary and lively pursuits, could just as easily be about human parent- (or grandparent-) child pairs: some of the softly colored illustrations depict scenarios that are more likely to occur within a home and/or other family-oriented setting. Makes sense: aren’t parents and other close family members children’s first teachers? This duality suggests that the book might be best shared one-on-one between a nostalgic adult and a child who’s developed some self-confidence, having learned a thing or two from a parent, grandparent, older relative, or classroom instructor.

A sweet, soft conversation starter and a charming gift. (Picture book. 4-7)

Pub Date: March 1, 2017

ISBN: 978-1-943200-08-5

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Compendium

Review Posted Online: Dec. 13, 2016

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 1, 2017

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