Keep handy for that gloomy day when a “Spaghetti Twister with a Tomato Tornado” might blow in or as an amusing how-to title...

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GRANDPA'S CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS COOKBOOK

Old and new fans of the classic tale of food delivered three times a day by the weather can tie on an apron, sharpen their culinary skills and dig in to 25 recipes inspired by the beloved book.

The Barretts team up once again to serve kid-friendly fare—to make and eat. A letter from Grandpa to Henry and Kate opens the book, and their reply brings the spiral-bound title to a close. Within, budding chefs will find some standard kids’-cookbook fare after a helpful list of “Grandpa’s Rules and Tools.” Pancakes, fried eggs, open-faced grilled-cheese sandwiches and mashed potatoes are often given clever names but are essentially basic items on the average American menu (“Noodlehead Noodles” = mac ’n’ cheese, for instance). Each spread features a cartoonish illustration of Grandpa engaged in a silly antic related to the recipe on the facing page. Each recipe clearly states the ingredients and directions—no matter how simple—so every dish seems possible to make, especially with an adult assisting. A photo of the end result is also provided to whet the appetite. “Milky Maple Soda” looks refreshing to sip while tackling the “Toasty Bread Houses,” square meatballs, “Foggy Pea Soup” or “Strawberry Tallcake.” Other than one odd warning not to “cremate” English-muffin pizzas under the broiler, the recipes are good and easy, and kids should find many sweet and savory options to tickle their taste buds.

Keep handy for that gloomy day when a “Spaghetti Twister with a Tomato Tornado” might blow in or as an amusing how-to title to help children discover the possible satisfying results that can come when following directions. (Cookbook. 5-8)

Pub Date: Aug. 27, 2013

ISBN: 978-1-4424-4475-1

Page Count: 64

Publisher: Atheneum

Review Posted Online: June 12, 2013

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 1, 2013

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This ambitious introduction to an important concept tries too hard to pigeonhole people, places, and things

NOUNS SAY "WHAT'S THAT?"

From the Word Adventures: Parts of Speech series

Anthropomorphized representations of a person, a place, and a thing introduce readers to nouns.

The protagonists are Person, a green, hairy, Cousin Itt–looking blob; Place, a round, blue, globe-ish being (stereotypically implied female by eyelashes and round pigtails); and Thing, a pink cloud with limbs, a porkpie hat, and red glasses. They first introduce the word “noun” and then start pointing out the nouns that fall under each of their categories. In their speech balloons, these vocabulary words are set in type that corresponds to the speaker’s color: “Each wheel is a thing noun,” says Thing, and “wheel” is set in red. Readers join the three as they visit a museum, pointing out the nouns they see along the way and introducing proper and collective nouns and ways to make nouns plural. Confusingly, though, Person labels the “bus driver” a “person noun” on one page, but two spreads later, Thing says “Abdar is a guard. Mrs. Mooney is a ticket taker. Their jobs are things that are also nouns.” Similarly, a group of athletes is a person noun—“team”—but “flock” and “pack” are things. Lowen’s digital illustrations portray a huge variety of people who display many skin and hair colors, differing abilities, and even religious and/or cultural markers (though no one is overweight). Backmatter includes a summary of noun facts, a glossary, an index (not seen), critical-thinking questions, and a list of further reading. Books on seven other parts of speech release simultaneously.

This ambitious introduction to an important concept tries too hard to pigeonhole people, places, and things . (Informational picture book. 5-8)

Pub Date: Aug. 1, 2019

ISBN: 978-1-5158-4058-9

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Picture Window Books

Review Posted Online: May 12, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 1, 2019

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Prospective younger visitors can do better than this bland mush.

MY FIRST BOOK OF NEW YORK

A scan of landmarks, neighborhoods, food, and other attractions in the Big Apple.

Perfunctory efforts to give this tour at least a pretense of geographic or thematic unity only add to its higgledy-piggledy character. Arrhenius (City, 2018, etc.) opens with a full-page view of the Brooklyn Bridge soaring over an otherwise-unidentifiable cityscape opposite a jumble of eight smaller images that are, for all that one is labeled “Brooklyn Academy of Music” and another “Coney Island,” are likewise so stylized as to look generic. From there, in the same one-topic-per-spread format, it’s on to Manhattan uptown and down for “Rockefeller Center,” “Shopping,” and other random bites. The “Harlem” spread features a fire hydrant, a mailbox, and the (actually distant) Cloisters museum, for instance, and a glance into “Queens” offers glimpses of the Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge, a “Greek restaurant,” a “Mexican restaurant,” and “marathon runners.” The large trim size and aesthetic mimic M. Sasek’s perennial This Is New York (1960, revised edition 2003) while adding much-needed updates with both more diverse arrays of dress and skin hues for the stylized human figures as well as the addition of sites such as the Stonewall Inn, the 9/11 memorial, and the Fearless Girl statue.

Prospective younger visitors can do better than this bland mush. (Informational picture book. 5-7)

Pub Date: Sept. 10, 2019

ISBN: 978-1-5362-0990-7

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Walker US/Candlewick

Review Posted Online: May 13, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 1, 2019

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