IGGIE'S HOUSE by Judy Blume

IGGIE'S HOUSE

Email this review

KIRKUS REVIEW

Iggie's cosmopolitan family is off to Tokyo and Winnie knew they'd sell to someone interesting--but her welcome to the Negro Garbers ('Detroit! Did you riot?') doesn't warm them and her championship of their cause isn't backed up by her parents: she's the bumbling, besieged liberal at age eleven. But not a girl to give up easily: to the kids at the playground she introduces the Garbers as Africans, to younger Tina Garber she insists that, sure there are black kids around--"just not today." Winnie's always hated "Little Miss Germ-Head" Clarice Landon and her busybody mother so it's no surprise that the latter circulates a petition advising the Garbers to move; what shocks Winnie is that her parents don't tell Mrs. Landon off. Her embarrassment with the Garbers--Herbie runs to hostile sarcasm, Glenn to constraint--is mitigated when the talk gets around to parents: both sets seem bent on "'protect(ing) the children from everything bad in the world.' Just close your eyes and it will go away." The kids' candor proves to be the nearest thing to a triumph on Grove Street: integration, such as it is, is a by-product of Mr. Garber's determination not to forsake a good job, the extremist Landons' departure, and the apathy of Winnie's parents--"Moving is just too much trouble." Occasionally forced (Mrs. Landon's crude tactics, Clarice's very name), loose though not slack--in fact evanescent except for the rueful truth.
Pub Date: April 13th, 1970
ISBN: 0440440629
Page count: 129pp
Publisher: Bradbury
Review Posted Online:
Kirkus Reviews Issue: April 1st, 1970




MORE BY JUDY BLUME

SIMILAR BOOKS SUGGESTED BY OUR CRITICS:

ChildrenDEVILS WITHIN by S.F. Henson
by S.F. Henson