WHAT’S IN BABY’S MORNING

Hindley repeats and answers the titular question as baby, family, and "little Hup" tickle and giggle through the morning. "A sister sleeping / just over there, / counting beads / and a little chair, / Spotty Dog / and Mrs. Cow, / and little Hup / the hippo." Youngsters are sure to find comfort in seeing another experience the gentle morning routine with familiar objects: socks and shoes, bib and cup, playing peek-a-boo, and a truck—just the right size for toddler fun. "Bug on a finger, juice in a cup. / Tickly grass when shoes come off." Dad swings baby up and sister finds the temporarily missing hippo; all seem happy and carefree and then it's naptime. Burroughes's sunny watercolors are soft and expressive, bringing the text to life with visual imagery just right for this tale of quiet happenings. (Picture book. 2-5)

Pub Date: July 1, 2004

ISBN: 0-7636-2372-5

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Candlewick

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 1, 2004

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THE I LOVE YOU BOOK

“I love you when you are scared. / I love you when you are brave. / I love you when I am away. / I love you when we are cuddled up close.” A characteristically multicolored cast of parents strings together declarative sentences to describe all the conditions under which they love their children, ending with, “Most of all, I love you just the way you are.” Parr’s entry in the Valentine’s Day sweepstakes looks like every other one of his books—childlike figures with heavy black outlines, bright primary hues with little regard to real coloration—and sounds like 90 percent of the rest of the “I love you” books. Ho-hum. (Picture book. 2-5)

Pub Date: Jan. 1, 2009

ISBN: 978-0-316-01985-9

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Megan Tingley/Little, Brown

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Nov. 15, 2008

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Plotless and pointless, the book clearly exists only because its celebrity author wrote it.

YOUR BABY'S FIRST WORD WILL BE DADA

A succession of animal dads do their best to teach their young to say “Dada” in this picture-book vehicle for Fallon.

A grumpy bull says, “DADA!”; his calf moos back. A sad-looking ram insists, “DADA!”; his lamb baas back. A duck, a bee, a dog, a rabbit, a cat, a mouse, a donkey, a pig, a frog, a rooster, and a horse all fail similarly, spread by spread. A final two-spread sequence finds all of the animals arrayed across the pages, dads on the verso and children on the recto. All the text prior to this point has been either iterations of “Dada” or animal sounds in dialogue bubbles; here, narrative text states, “Now everybody get in line, let’s say it together one more time….” Upon the turn of the page, the animal dads gaze round-eyed as their young across the gutter all cry, “DADA!” (except the duckling, who says, “quack”). Ordóñez's illustrations have a bland, digital look, compositions hardly varying with the characters, although the pastel-colored backgrounds change. The punch line fails from a design standpoint, as the sudden, single-bubble chorus of “DADA” appears to be emanating from background features rather than the baby animals’ mouths (only some of which, on close inspection, appear to be open). It also fails to be funny.

Plotless and pointless, the book clearly exists only because its celebrity author wrote it. (Picture book. 3-5)

Pub Date: June 9, 2015

ISBN: 978-1-250-00934-0

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Feiwel & Friends

Review Posted Online: April 15, 2015

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 2015

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