Who can resist this dog’s big begging eyes and the leash in its mouth? Both toddlers and preschoolers will happily take this...

LET'S GO OUTSIDE

A Bernese mountain dog pup graces the cover of this deceptively simple board book.

Throughout, the focus is on the dog’s behavior while the child on the other end of the leash plays a supporting role. The pale-skinned child’s indeterminate gender allows children of all gender expressions to put themselves in the story. A subtle lesson about opposites is hidden in plain sight in the simple text. Adjectives that are also opposites are highlighted in bold on each page. “Darkness turns to light. / A smooth nose sniffs rough sidewalk.” Felix’s illustrations help define the abstract concepts. For example, the verso of the opening spread is shadowed and dark, while the recto uses a lighter palette, dramatizing the first statement. Riggs assumes that young children will understand expressive verbs such as “thwack” and “print” (as in pawprint) from context and visual clues. The dog’s large, expressive eyes are the constant, setting readers up for the final line: “Back inside, happy eyes say, ‘Let’s go outside again!’ ”

Who can resist this dog’s big begging eyes and the leash in its mouth? Both toddlers and preschoolers will happily take this pup for a walk, again and again. (Board book. 1-4)

Pub Date: March 13, 2018

ISBN: 978-1-56846-316-2

Page Count: 14

Publisher: Creative Editions/Creative Company

Review Posted Online: May 23, 2018

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 1, 2018

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Uncomplicated fun that sets readers up for the earlier, more-complicated books to come.

LITTLE BLUE TRUCK'S SPRINGTIME

From the Little Blue Truck series

Little Blue Truck and his pal Toad meet friends old and new on a springtime drive through the country.

This lift-the-flap, interactive entry in the popular Little Blue Truck series lacks the narrative strength and valuable life lessons of the original Little Blue Truck (2008) and its sequel, Little Blue Truck Leads the Way (2009). Both of those books, published for preschoolers rather than toddlers, featured rich storylines, dramatic, kinetic illustrations, and simple but valuable life lessons—the folly of taking oneself too seriously, the importance of friends, and the virtue of taking turns, for example. At about half the length and with half as much text as the aforementioned titles, this volume is a much quicker read. Less a story than a vernal celebration, the book depicts a bucolic drive through farmland and encounters with various animals and their young along the way. Beautifully rendered two-page tableaux teem with butterflies, blossoms, and vibrant pastel, springtime colors. Little Blue greets a sheep standing in the door of a barn: “Yoo-hoo, Sheep! / Beep-beep! / What’s new?” Folding back the durable, card-stock flap reveals the barn’s interior and an adorable set of twin lambs. Encounters with a duck and nine ducklings, a cow with a calf, a pig with 10 (!) piglets, a family of bunnies, and a chicken with a freshly hatched chick provide ample opportunity for counting and vocabulary work.

Uncomplicated fun that sets readers up for the earlier, more-complicated books to come. (Board book. 1-4)

Pub Date: Jan. 2, 2018

ISBN: 978-0-544-93809-0

Page Count: 16

Publisher: HMH Books

Review Posted Online: March 4, 2018

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 1, 2018

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Sweet—but more for adults than children.

ALL THE LOVE IN THE WORLD

A doting pair of adult bears follows a baby bear through a busy day.

These fully engaged caregivers are clearly awed by the little cub, starting with “You’re the morning sunshine” and ending with “you sleep so peacefully / beneath the twinkling stars.” In between, the baby bear paints a picture, sings with one adult, tickles with the other, drinks cocoa, takes a walk and flies a kite, rides a bike, and is playfully swung in the air before a bath. Much of the action is communicated only by the pictures. The tender rhyming verses focus on the wonder of familial love. Every other stanza ends with the refrain: “This world of ours is full of love / when you are here with me.” Curiously, although this cub has two present, caregiving adults, the narrative, presumably addressed to the child, uses the first-person singular. The baby bear is presented as gender-neutral, first in orange-and-green polka-dot pajamas and then in blue jeans with a white shirt graced with yellow ducks. Although neither adult bear is gendered in the text, the illustrations use stereotypical cues: One wears a yellow dress decorated with hearts; the other wears a striped shirt (and no trousers). No one can miss that the baby bear is the adults’ little darling.

Sweet—but more for adults than children. (Board book. 1-3)

Pub Date: Dec. 24, 2019

ISBN: 978-1-68010-603-9

Page Count: 22

Publisher: Tiger Tales

Review Posted Online: Dec. 18, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 15, 2020

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