This highly readable and vital collection demonstrates the multiplicity of ways that mental health impacts individuals.

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(DON'T) CALL ME CRAZY

33 VOICES START THE CONVERSATION ABOUT MENTAL HEALTH

A lively, compelling anthology about mental health by over 30 contributors from a variety of backgrounds.

The essays in this collection about mental health are accompanied by graphics, a list of novels to explore, and photographs, among other formats. Recurring themes include paying attention to the power of language and labels, the necessity of support and community, and the importance of normalizing conversations about mental health issues. Essays are mostly brief, highly personal accounts that discuss individual experiences with various conditions ranging from depression and bipolar disorder to trichotillomania and misophonia. Adam Silvera explains why he writes sad stories for teens and the meaning behind his Happiness Goes On tattoo. Libba Bray offers insights in the form of a dialogue among herself, her OCD, and her anxiety while seated on an airplane. The entries from artists, actors, journalists, authors, poets, illustrators, musicians, athletes, and bloggers offer inspiration and guidance both by example and through more explicit advice, with contributors representing different genders, ethnicities, and sexual orientations. While the loose structure disorients at times, making some entries feel randomly thrown together, the raw, informal approach to the subject matter will highly appeal to young people who crave understanding and validation. A valuable addition to library collections and for use by school counselors.

This highly readable and vital collection demonstrates the multiplicity of ways that mental health impacts individuals. (resources, contributor bios) (Nonfiction. 13-18)

Pub Date: Oct. 2, 2018

ISBN: 978-1-61620-781-6

Page Count: 240

Publisher: Algonquin

Review Posted Online: May 28, 2018

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 1, 2018

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Necessary for every home, school, and public library.

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SHOUT

“This is the story of a girl who lost her voice and wrote herself a new one.”

The award-winning author, who is also a rape survivor, opens up in this powerful free-verse memoir, holding nothing back. Part 1 begins with her father’s lifelong struggle as a World War II veteran, her childhood and rape at 13 by a boy she liked, the resulting downward spiral, her recovery during a year as an exchange student in Denmark, and the dream that gave her Melinda, Speak’s (1999) protagonist. Part 2 takes readers through her journey as a published author and National Book Award finalist. She recalls some of the many stories she’s heard during school visits from boys and girls who survived rape and sexual abuse and calls out censorship that has prevented some speaking engagements. In Part 3, she wraps up with poems about her family roots. The verse flows like powerful music, and Anderson's narrative voice is steady and direct: “We should teach our girls / that snapping is OK, / instead of waiting / for someone else to break them.” The poems range in length from a pair of two-line stanzas to several pages. Readers new to Anderson will find this accessible. It’s a strong example of how lived experience shapes art and an important book for the #MeToo movement.

Necessary for every home, school, and public library. (resources) (Verse memoir. 13-adult)

Pub Date: March 12, 2019

ISBN: 978-0-670-01210-7

Page Count: 304

Publisher: Viking

Review Posted Online: Dec. 19, 2018

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 15, 2019

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There are some funny moments, particularly in the simple black-and-white cartoons of a girl and boy that accompany the text...

HOW NOT TO BE A DICK

AN EVERYDAY ETIQUETTE GUIDE

Jokes about cheese logs abound in this humorous but sometimes-belabored etiquette guide ostensibly aimed at teens.

Following an introduction that defines what makes a person seem like a dick, seven chapters address situations ranging from initiating romantic relationships to behaving responsibly at after-office get-togethers. An uneasy line is straddled in terms of its intended age range. Readers are dutifully exhorted to make sure they wear proper attire to school dances: “Most schools have dress codes for dances. Read them carefully!” Yet there’s also advice on how to politely use a coffee shop as your office if you’re working from home. Further, a section on safety and manners at parties seems at times to employ the euphemistic term “sugary beverages” for alcohol and suggests “If you are buzzing on sugar or if someone spiked the punch, DO NOT DRIVE.” This cagey approach to the topic of teen drinking is confusing at best and at worst, may strike readers as condescending.

There are some funny moments, particularly in the simple black-and-white cartoons of a girl and boy that accompany the text throughout. However, as etiquette goes, there’s not much that is new here and a real question of whom this is for. (Nonfiction. 14 & up)

Pub Date: Oct. 1, 2013

ISBN: 978-1-936976-02-7

Page Count: 176

Publisher: Zest Books

Review Posted Online: Aug. 14, 2013

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 1, 2013

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