NO PROBLEM!

AN EASY GUIDE TO GETTING WHAT YOU WANT

It’s good CEOs are around to offer advice on problem solving. After all, what would the world be like “if Mahatma Gandhi, Martin Luther King Jr., Eleanor Roosevelt, John F. Kennedy, or Steve Jobs had thought that they couldn’t change anything”? An adaptation for young readers of Watanabe’s bestselling Problem Solving 101: A Simple Book for Smart People (2009), this volume will, ostensibly, teach young people how to solve problems and make it to the top. Beginning with attitudes that hamper problem solving—personified by Sophie Sigh, Chris Critic, Darla Dreamer and Gary Go-Getter—the guide proceeds with a full array of colorful charts, cartoons, steps, strategies and pros and cons, with cutesy characters Rita, Rad and Remi, Kiwi and Carlos to lead the way to success. One of the problems to solve may well be how to get through this guide—not as easy as the subtitle suggests. Smith’s cartoonish illustrations and the splashy colors aren’t enough to make young readers want to wade through all of the tips, grids and strategies. (Self-help. 10 & up)

Pub Date: June 8, 2010

ISBN: 978-0-670-01203-9

Page Count: 80

Publisher: Viking

Review Posted Online: May 31, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 15, 2010

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Essential.

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THIS BOOK IS ANTI-RACIST

20 LESSONS ON HOW TO WAKE UP, TAKE ACTION, AND DO THE WORK

A guidebook for taking action against racism.

The clear title and bold, colorful illustrations will immediately draw attention to this book, designed to guide each reader on a personal journey to work to dismantle racism. In the author’s note, Jewell begins with explanations about word choice, including the use of the terms “folx,” because it is gender neutral, and “global majority,” noting that marginalized communities of color are actually the majority in the world. She also chooses to capitalize Black, Brown, and Indigenous as a way of centering these communities’ voices; "white" is not capitalized. Organized in four sections—identity, history, taking action, and working in solidarity—each chapter builds on the lessons of the previous section. Underlined words are defined in the glossary, but Jewell unpacks concepts around race in an accessible way, bringing attention to common misunderstandings. Activities are included at the end of each chapter; they are effective, prompting both self-reflection and action steps from readers. The activities are designed to not be written inside the actual book; instead Jewell invites readers to find a special notebook and favorite pen and use that throughout. Combining the disruption of common fallacies, spotlights on change makers, the author’s personal reflections, and a call to action, this powerful book has something for all young people no matter what stage they are at in terms of awareness or activism.

Essential. (author’s note, further reading, glossary, select bibliography) (Nonfiction. 10-18)

Pub Date: Jan. 7, 2020

ISBN: 978-0-7112-4521-1

Page Count: 160

Publisher: Frances Lincoln

Review Posted Online: Sept. 15, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Oct. 1, 2019

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A slim volume big on historical information and insight.

COME ON IN, AMERICA

THE UNITED STATES IN WORLD WAR I

A wide-ranging exploration of World War I and how it changed the United States forever.

Students who know anything about history tend to know other wars better—the Civil War, World War II, Vietnam. But it was World War I that changed America and ushered in a new role for the United States as a world political and economic leader. Two million Americans were sent to the war, and in the 19 months of involvement in Europe, 53,000 Americans were killed in battle, part of the staggering total death toll of 10 million, a war of such magnitude that it transformed the governments and economies of every major participant. Osborne’s straightforward text is a clear account of the war itself and various related topics—African-American soldiers, the Woman’s Peace Party, the use of airplanes as weapons for the first time, trench warfare, and the sinking of the Lusitania. Many archival photographs complement the text, as does a map of Europe (though some countries are lost in the gutter). A thorough bibliography includes several works for young readers. A study of World War I offers a context for discussing world events today, so this volume is a good bet for libraries and classrooms—a well-written treatment that can replace dry textbook accounts.

A slim volume big on historical information and insight. (timeline, source notes, credits) (Nonfiction. 10-14)

Pub Date: March 14, 2017

ISBN: 978-1-4197-2378-0

Page Count: 176

Publisher: Abrams

Review Posted Online: Dec. 26, 2016

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 15, 2017

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