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A PENNY'S WORTH

Combining a dash of math with buckets of good humor, this book is certainly like money in the bank.

A newly minted penny searches for meaning.

“Hot off the minting press, Penny sparkled,” the story begins, but her initial gusto turns to sorrow when it becomes clear that the world only sees her as a lowly cent, fit to be ignored. As she is jostled about by the tide of circumstance, she meets various coins and types of paper who enlighten her on the ways of the world. Sticking out of an open purse, Bill Bill, a $1 note cowpoke, cautions her that “it takes a hundred of you to do what I do.” In a video game arcade, Quarter coolly explains that “slot surfin’ is quarters-only. You’re twenty-four cents short.” In a sweet shop, donnish Dime subjects Penny to a cogent history lesson about inflation’s effects on so-called “penny candy.” Nickel, a morose street coin with beard stubble, turns down her offer to pair up. Penny hits a low point when she encounters an alarming newspaper headline: “THE GREAT PENNY DEBATE: ARE THEY WORTHLESS?” Thankfully, her fortunes shift upon meeting another penny who encourages her (“Heads up…we’re good luck when we put our best face forward!”) and leads her to the one place where she and her kind are truly valued. Filled with clever and chucklesome wordplay, Wilson’s spry narrative is engaging but also educational, providing a solid, accessible introduction to basic money equivalents. Hoffmann’s illustrations, rendered in acrylic, colored pencil, and pan pastel with digital touches, incorporate comicslike sound effects and nimbly extend the text with comedic touches.

Combining a dash of math with buckets of good humor, this book is certainly like money in the bank. (facts, author’s note, chart, bibliography) (Picture book. 4-8)

Pub Date: April 5, 2022

ISBN: 978-1-64567-468-9

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Page Street

Review Posted Online: Dec. 26, 2021

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 15, 2022

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ON THE FIRST DAY OF KINDERGARTEN

While this is a fairly bland treatment compared to Deborah Lee Rose and Carey Armstrong-Ellis’ The Twelve Days of...

Rabe follows a young girl through her first 12 days of kindergarten in this book based on the familiar Christmas carol.

The typical firsts of school are here: riding the bus, making friends, sliding on the playground slide, counting, sorting shapes, laughing at lunch, painting, singing, reading, running, jumping rope, and going on a field trip. While the days are given ordinal numbers, the song skips the cardinal numbers in the verses, and the rhythm is sometimes off: “On the second day of kindergarten / I thought it was so cool / making lots of friends / and riding the bus to my school!” The narrator is a white brunette who wears either a tunic or a dress each day, making her pretty easy to differentiate from her classmates, a nice mix in terms of race; two students even sport glasses. The children in the ink, paint, and collage digital spreads show a variety of emotions, but most are happy to be at school, and the surroundings will be familiar to those who have made an orientation visit to their own schools.

While this is a fairly bland treatment compared to Deborah Lee Rose and Carey Armstrong-Ellis’ The Twelve Days of Kindergarten (2003), it basically gets the job done. (Picture book. 4-7)

Pub Date: June 21, 2016

ISBN: 978-0-06-234834-0

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Harper/HarperCollins

Review Posted Online: May 3, 2016

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 1, 2016

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WILLOW THE WHITE HOUSE CAT

Kids will enjoy the opportunity to “mews” on the doings of a presidential pet.

First Lady Biden and Capucilli, author of the Biscuit series, explain how Willow the cat came to reside at the White House.

Willow lives contentedly in a barn. One day, she’s curious when cars approach and people gather to hear a blond woman speak. Willow draws closer, then is delighted as the woman lifts her up and hugs her. That evening, light-skinned Farmer Rick tells Willow she made “quite an impression”: The visitor has invited Willow to live with her. A car arrives to drive Willow away to the White House, her new home in Washington, D.C. There, she’s welcomed by the first lady—the same woman who tenderly held her at the farm. Willow meets the president and explores her new home, filled with elegantly furnished rooms, grand staircases, and historic portraits. Plus, there’s a toy-filled basket! Best of all, there are wonderful people who work in and visit this beautiful house who show Willow kindness and affection. Willow’s favorite resting spot is at the president’s side in the Oval Office, though she also enjoys watching the first lady read to children on the lawn. Animal lovers will especially appreciate this sweet, cat’s-eye view of the White House, which helps humanize the first family by depicting them as ordinary feline fanciers. The loose ink, acrylic, and paint illustrations are cheerful and cozy. Background characters are racially diverse.

Kids will enjoy the opportunity to “mews” on the doings of a presidential pet. (author’s note from Biden, photos) (Picture book. 5-8)

Pub Date: June 4, 2024

ISBN: 9781665952057

Page Count: 48

Publisher: Paula Wiseman/Simon & Schuster

Review Posted Online: April 20, 2024

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 15, 2024

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