Richly illustrated with period photographs and strikingly designed, this is a clear, accessible depiction of a major story...

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TWELVE DAYS IN MAY

FREEDOM RIDE 1961

Even after some Jim Crow laws were declared unconstitutional, many states continued to refuse to adhere to the changes. Sibert Honor–winning author Brimner (Black and White, 2011) explores the first “Freedom Ride” in May 1961, as seven black and six white activists ranging in age from 18 to 61 set out to bring attention to this resistance.

Recruited by the Congress of Racial Equality, they left Washington, D.C., on commercial buses, planning to arrive in New Orleans on May 17 to celebrate the seventh anniversary of Brown v. Board of Education. As they traveled south, they encountered expected resistance. White Freedom Riders were denied service at colored-only lunch counters. Joseph Perkins, a black rider, attempted to get a shoeshine in the “white chair” and, when he refused to move, was arrested. As the bus continued south, the responses to the riders became increasingly more violent. Three of the group, including John Lewis, were severely beaten even though they remained nonviolent. As they approached Birmingham, Alabama, they were met by the Ku Klux Klan and abandoned by law enforcement. Brimner does an excellent job giving the necessary context for the events, and the day-by-day focus provides dramatic tension for the narrative. Useful backmatter includes biographical sketches, bibliography, source notes, index, and picture credits.

Richly illustrated with period photographs and strikingly designed, this is a clear, accessible depiction of a major story in the civil rights movement. (Nonfiction. 10-18)

Pub Date: Nov. 7, 2017

ISBN: 978-1-62979-586-7

Page Count: 112

Publisher: Calkins Creek/Boyds Mills

Review Posted Online: July 15, 2017

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 1, 2017

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Essential.

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THIS BOOK IS ANTI-RACIST

20 LESSONS ON HOW TO WAKE UP, TAKE ACTION, AND DO THE WORK

A guidebook for taking action against racism.

The clear title and bold, colorful illustrations will immediately draw attention to this book, designed to guide each reader on a personal journey to work to dismantle racism. In the author’s note, Jewell begins with explanations about word choice, including the use of the terms “folx,” because it is gender neutral, and “global majority,” noting that marginalized communities of color are actually the majority in the world. She also chooses to capitalize Black, Brown, and Indigenous as a way of centering these communities’ voices; "white" is not capitalized. Organized in four sections—identity, history, taking action, and working in solidarity—each chapter builds on the lessons of the previous section. Underlined words are defined in the glossary, but Jewell unpacks concepts around race in an accessible way, bringing attention to common misunderstandings. Activities are included at the end of each chapter; they are effective, prompting both self-reflection and action steps from readers. The activities are designed to not be written inside the actual book; instead Jewell invites readers to find a special notebook and favorite pen and use that throughout. Combining the disruption of common fallacies, spotlights on change makers, the author’s personal reflections, and a call to action, this powerful book has something for all young people no matter what stage they are at in terms of awareness or activism.

Essential. (author’s note, further reading, glossary, select bibliography) (Nonfiction. 10-18)

Pub Date: Jan. 7, 2020

ISBN: 978-0-7112-4521-1

Page Count: 160

Publisher: Frances Lincoln

Review Posted Online: Sept. 15, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Oct. 1, 2019

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SMILE

Telgemeier has created an utterly charming graphic memoir of tooth trauma, first crushes and fickle friends, sweetly reminiscent of Judy Blume’s work. One night, Raina trips and falls after a Girl Scout meeting, knocking out her two front teeth. This leads to years of painful surgeries, braces, agonizing root canals and other oral atrocities. Her friends offer little solace through this trying ordeal, spending more of their time teasing than comforting her. After years of these girls’ constant belittling, Raina branches out and finds her own voice and a new group of friends. Young girls will relate to her story, and her friend-angst is palpable. Readers should not overlook this seemingly simply drawn work; the strong writing and emotionally expressive characters add an unexpected layer of depth. As an afterword, the author includes a photo of her smiling, showing off the results of all of the years of pain she endured. Irresistible, funny and touching—a must read for all teenage girls, whether en-braced or not. (Graphic memoir. 12 & up)

Pub Date: Feb. 1, 2010

ISBN: 978-0-545-13205-3

Page Count: 224

Publisher: Bantam Discovery

Review Posted Online: Dec. 22, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 1, 2010

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