FIND A STRANGER, SAY GOODBYE

Though her adoptive father is a compassionate doctor who inspires Natalie to follow in his footsteps, and her mother a groovy and artistic lady who picks dandelions in her nightgown (a supposedly hilarious story) and does such mad things as paint her clawfoot bathtub's toenails Crimson Passion, 17-year-old Natalie Armstrong is determined to track down her natural parents. Feeling hurt at first, the Armstrongs give her time, money, documents, and a car with which to conduct her quest; and after some mechanical poking about and scarcely a setback, she manages a brief but sufficient encounter with the poised, complacently settled, famous model of 32 who had given birth at 15, after giving in just once to a demanding, immature college boy. That established, Natalie can go back to being an Armstrong and to appreciating, among the other family members, her creative sculptor grandmother who just loves "how saffron changes ordinary rice to such a marvelous shade of gold" and who amazes them all with her handmade giftwrap and her earth-toned decor. The one false note in Lowry's affecting A Summer to Die (1977) was her treatment of the "hippie" couple and the town's far-fetched intolerance. But compared to the characters and relationships here—right down to such bit-players as Natalie's very undemanding boyfriend and a modern-type librarian who helps in her search—the entire previous novel was a model of precision and subtle modulation. This one is readable, but grating.

Pub Date: March 1, 1978

ISBN: 0395264596

Page Count: 198

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin

Review Posted Online: Oct. 17, 2011

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 1, 1978

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An earnest examination of mental health in sports.

GEESE ARE NEVER SWANS

Sixteen-year-old Gus Bennett lives in the shadow of his older brother, Danny, a former Olympic swimming hopeful who recently died by suicide.

Gus does not have an easy home life: He has a strained relationship with his mother, a single parent who’s still struggling after Danny’s death; and his older sister, Darien, has a drug addiction and abandoned her now 18-month-old child to the care of their mother. But Gus hopes to train with Coach Marks, the renowned trainer who worked with his brother. He even sneaks into the country club to get access to the pool, willing to do whatever it takes to succeed. He has his eye on qualifying for the national team and seems poised for success, but he soon experiences a downward spiral and engages in reckless behavior. Although the side characters are underdeveloped, Gus’ first-person narration carries the story along smoothly. Conceptualized by the late Academy Award–winning basketball player Bryant and written by Clark, this emotional novel contains lyrical prose that beautifully captures the energy of swimming and short chapters that will keep readers engaged. Physical descriptions are limited, suggesting a white default, but naming conventions suggest some diversity among the swim team members.

An earnest examination of mental health in sports. (resources) (Fiction. 12-18)

Pub Date: July 21, 2020

ISBN: 978-1-949520-05-7

Page Count: 288

Publisher: Granity Studios

Review Posted Online: June 1, 2020

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 15, 2020

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Riveting, brutal and beautifully told.

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WE WERE LIARS

A devastating tale of greed and secrets springs from the summer that tore Cady’s life apart.

Cady Sinclair’s family uses its inherited wealth to ensure that each successive generation is blond, beautiful and powerful. Reunited each summer by the family patriarch on his private island, his three adult daughters and various grandchildren lead charmed, fairy-tale lives (an idea reinforced by the periodic inclusions of Cady’s reworkings of fairy tales to tell the Sinclair family story). But this is no sanitized, modern Disney fairy tale; this is Cinderella with her stepsisters’ slashed heels in bloody glass slippers. Cady’s fairy-tale retellings are dark, as is the personal tragedy that has led to her examination of the skeletons in the Sinclair castle’s closets; its rent turns out to be extracted in personal sacrifices. Brilliantly, Lockhart resists simply crucifying the Sinclairs, which might make the family’s foreshadowed tragedy predictable or even satisfying. Instead, she humanizes them (and their painful contradictions) by including nostalgic images that showcase the love shared among Cady, her two cousins closest in age, and Gat, the Heathcliff-esque figure she has always loved. Though increasingly disenchanted with the Sinclair legacy of self-absorption, the four believe family redemption is possible—if they have the courage to act. Their sincere hopes and foolish naïveté make the teens’ desperate, grand gesture all that much more tragic.

Riveting, brutal and beautifully told. (Fiction. 14 & up)

Pub Date: May 13, 2014

ISBN: 978-0-385-74126-2

Page Count: 240

Publisher: Delacorte

Review Posted Online: March 17, 2014

Kirkus Reviews Issue: April 1, 2014

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