NOT YET A YETI

A British import presents an allegory about self-knowledge, acceptance, and, maybe, coming out.

George’s grandad, mom, dad, and older sister are all yetis—all of them but George. George asks his grandad, dad, and older sister: “When will I be a yeti?” Each of them give him various responses: “When you can survive alone on a frozen mountain, waiting to lure stray hikers to their DOOM,” or “when you can chase people round the mountain until they SCREAM with TERROR.” Not wild about those options, George turns to Mom, who asks, “Do you want to be a yeti?” He thinks about it only to realize that he wants to be a unicorn. At the moment when George realizes his innermost desire, Neal depicts a rainbow bridge atop which gambol pastel unicorns holding balloons, riding a bicycle, and blowing bubbles. In a decision that feels odd for a book about nonconformity, Mom dons pink pearls and an apron, older sister wears pink bows, and Grandad and Dad are aggressive and loud, all reinforcing gender stereotypes. The title of the book goes for alliteration and humor but seems to lack forethought. If the yetis are a metaphor for normative culture, then what is the book saying about them? Treleaven delivers a well-meaning message inclusive of self-definition and acceptance—but readers should consider opting for Jessica Love’s Julián Is a Mermaid (2018) instead.

Not yet affirming. (Picture book. 4-8)

Pub Date: Oct. 1, 2019

ISBN: 978-1-84886-414-6

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Maverick Publishing

Review Posted Online: July 24, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 15, 2019

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The dynamic interaction between the characters invites readers to take risks, push boundaries, and have a little unscripted...

CLAYMATES

Reinvention is the name of the game for two blobs of clay.

A blue-eyed gray blob and a brown-eyed brown blob sit side by side, unsure as to what’s going to happen next. The gray anticipates an adventure, while the brown appears apprehensive. A pair of hands descends, and soon, amid a flurry of squishing and prodding and poking and sculpting, a handsome gray wolf and a stately brown owl emerge. The hands disappear, leaving the friends to their own devices. The owl is pleased, but the wolf convinces it that the best is yet to come. An ear pulled here and an extra eye placed there, and before you can shake a carving stick, a spurt of frenetic self-exploration—expressed as a tangled black scribble—reveals a succession of smug hybrid beasts. After all, the opportunity to become a “pig-e-phant” doesn’t come around every day. But the sound of approaching footsteps panics the pair of Picassos. How are they going to “fix [them]selves” on time? Soon a hippopotamus and peacock are staring bug-eyed at a returning pair of astonished hands. The creative naiveté of the “clay mates” is perfectly captured by Petty’s feisty, spot-on dialogue: “This was your idea…and it was a BAD one.” Eldridge’s endearing sculpted images are photographed against the stark white background of an artist’s work table to great effect.

The dynamic interaction between the characters invites readers to take risks, push boundaries, and have a little unscripted fun of their own . (Picture book. 5-8)

Pub Date: June 20, 2017

ISBN: 978-0-316-30311-8

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Little, Brown

Review Posted Online: March 29, 2017

Kirkus Reviews Issue: April 15, 2017

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WE ARE IN A BOOK!

From the Elephant & Piggie series

Stalwart friends Piggie and Gerald the elephant push the metafictive envelope in a big way when they realize that "someone is looking at us." Is it a monster? worries Gerald. "No," replies the squinting Piggie. "It is... / a reader! / A reader is reading us!" How? wonders Gerald. Piggie drapes herself on a word bubble to demonstrate: "We are in a book!" "THAT IS SO COOL!" Joy leads to a little bit of clever practical joking—Piggie figures out how to make the readers say "banana" out loud, and hilarity ensues—which gives way to existential angst: "The book ends?!" exclaims an appalled Gerald. Emergent readers just beginning to grapple one-on-one with the rules of the printed codex will find the friends' antics both funny and provocative: Just who is in control here, anyway? As always, Willems displays his customary control of both body language and pacing even as he challenges his readers to engage with his characters and the physicality of their book . The friends' solution to the book's imminent end? "Hello. Will you please read us again?" You bet. (Early reader. 4-8)

Pub Date: Sept. 14, 2010

ISBN: 978-1-4231-3308-7

Page Count: 64

Publisher: Hyperion

Review Posted Online: March 25, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 1, 2010

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