Punctuated with the dark humor you’d expect from a graduate of the streets, a thoughtful treatise with implications far...

MOB RULES

WHAT THE MAFIA CAN TEACH THE LEGITIMATE BUSINESSMAN

A veteran mobster who walked away from “The Life” with his head held high offers road-tested life lessons that served him well inside and outside La Cosa Nostra.

Some Mafia dons have their heads blown off. Others live long enough to expire peacefully in their own beds. In either event, Ferrante—who left prison behind eight years ago to become a well-respected author—insists that today’s CEOs, middle managers and employees would do well to learn a thing or two from their counterparts in the underworld. Building his case in concise, economical prose, Ferrante draws on an extensive knowledge of world events, mob lore and personal experience to deliver an engrossing sophomore effort that reads like a rousing memoir, meditation on world history and Mafia exposé all in one. Who would have thought that George Washington had so much in common with Lucky Luciano, the “Founding Father” of the American mob, or that there was something good to be said for “Scarface” Al Capone? In eschewing mob violence, Ferrante has nonetheless retained an appreciation for the way the mob operates as a successful business enterprise. When it works, Ferrante writes, it’s a blueprint for the way businesses in the “legit” world ought to operate. And when it doesn’t, it’s a sobering cautionary tale for every over-reaching CEO, power-hungry middle manager and clueless employee.

Punctuated with the dark humor you’d expect from a graduate of the streets, a thoughtful treatise with implications far outside the boardroom.

Pub Date: June 2, 2011

ISBN: 978-1-59184-398-6

Page Count: 272

Publisher: Portfolio

Review Posted Online: May 4, 2011

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 15, 2011

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IN COLD BLOOD

"There's got to be something wrong with somebody who'd do a thing like that." This is Perry Edward Smith, talking about himself. "Deal me out, baby...I'm a normal." This is Richard Eugene Hickock, talking about himself. They're as sick a pair as Leopold and Loeb and together they killed a mother, a father, a pretty 17-year-old and her brother, none of whom they'd seen before, in cold blood. A couple of days before they had bought a 100 foot rope to garrote them—enough for ten people if necessary. This small pogrom took place in Holcomb, Kansas, a lonesome town on a flat, limitless landscape: a depot, a store, a cafe, two filling stations, 270 inhabitants. The natives refer to it as "out there." It occurred in 1959 and Capote has spent five years, almost all of the time which has since elapsed, in following up this crime which made no sense, had no motive, left few clues—just a footprint and a remembered conversation. Capote's alternating dossier Shifts from the victims, the Clutter family, to the boy who had loved Nancy Clutter, and her best friend, to the neighbors, and to the recently paroled perpetrators: Perry, with a stunted child's legs and a changeling's face, and Dick, who had one squinting eye but a "smile that works." They had been cellmates at the Kansas State Penitentiary where another prisoner had told them about the Clutters—he'd hired out once on Mr. Clutter's farm and thought that Mr. Clutter was perhaps rich. And this is the lead which finally broke the case after Perry and Dick had drifted down to Mexico, back to the midwest, been seen in Kansas City, and were finally picked up in Las Vegas. The last, even more terrible chapters, deal with their confessions, the law man who wanted to see them hanged, back to back, the trial begun in 1960, the post-ponements of the execution, and finally the walk to "The Corner" and Perry's soft-spoken words—"It would be meaningless to apologize for what I did. Even inappropriate. But I do. I apologize." It's a magnificent job—this American tragedy—with the incomparable Capote touches throughout. There may never have been a perfect crime, but if there ever has been a perfect reconstruction of one, surely this must be it.

Pub Date: Jan. 7, 1965

ISBN: 0375507906

Page Count: 343

Publisher: Random House

Review Posted Online: Oct. 10, 2011

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 1, 1965

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BEATING THE STREET

More uncommonly sensible investment guidance from a master of the game. Drawing on his experience at Fidelity's Magellan Fund, a high- profile vehicle he quit at age 46 in 1990 after a spectacularly successful 13-year tenure as managing director, Lynch (One Up on Wall Street, 1988) makes a strong case for common stocks over bonds, CDs, or other forms of debt. In breezy, anecdotal fashion, the author also encourages individuals to go it alone in the market rather than to bank on money managers whose performance seldom justifies their generous compensation. With the caveat that there's as much art as science to picking issues with upside potential, Lynch commends legwork and observation. ``Spending more time at the mall,'' he argues, invariably is a better way to unearth appreciation candidates than relying on technical, timing, or other costly divining services prized by professionals. The author provides detailed briefings on how he researches industries, special situations, and mutual funds. Particularly instructive are his candid discussions of where he went wrong as well as right in his search for undervalued securities. Throughout the genial text, Lynch offers wry, on-target advisories under the rubric of ``Peter's Principles.'' Commenting on the profits that have accrued to those acquiring shares in enterprises privatized by the British government, he notes: ``Whatever the Queen is selling, buy it.'' In praise of corporate parsimony, the author suggests that, ``all else being equal, invest in the company with the fewest photos in the annual report.'' Another bull's-eye for a consummate pro, with appeal for market veterans and rookies alike. (Charts and tabular material— not seen.)

Pub Date: March 1, 1993

ISBN: 0-671-75915-9

Page Count: 320

Publisher: Simon & Schuster

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 1, 1993

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